OBITUARIES FOR SURNAMES
BEGINNING WITH "M"





  MACKEY, Raymond

Raymond Mackey, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. P. Mackey, died at 12 o'clock Wednesday night at their home on West Main. The funeral will be held from the residence this afternoon.

Decatur Daily Review, December 2, 1892





  MADDOCK, John C.

DIED - On the 10th, John C., son of John Maddock, aged 3 years.

Illinois State Chronicle (Decatur), 18 Sep 1856





  MADDOX, James Edward
    Born: 6 Jul 1882 in Long Creek, Macon Co, IL
    Died: 27 Jun 1945 in Decatur, Macon Co, IL
    Buried: Point Pleasant Cem, Long Creek, Macon Co, IL
    Parents: Notley M. and Nancy A. (Lane) Maddox
    Married: Minnie "Bessie" Lane
    Children: Fern, Erma, Grace, Wayne, Lynn, Lila, Mildren, Carroll




  MADDOX, James C.
    Born: 4 Jul 1863 in KY
    Died: 26 Dec 1944 in Decatur, Macon Co, IL
    Buried: Mt. Zion Cemetery, Mt. Zion, Macon Co, IL
    Parents: Edward and Rhoda (Montgomery) Maddox
    Married: Rose (Cameron) Maiden
    Children: Hester, Mabel




  MADDOX, Mary Frances
    Born: 20 May 1844 in Lexington, KY
    Died: 4 May 1924 in Decatur, Macon Co, IL
    Buried: Mt. Zion Cem, Mt. Zion, Macon Co, IL
    Parents: Mr. & Mrs. McCormick
    Married: Thomas Maddox, Sr.
    Children: Rhoda, Thomas Jr.,Ida, Marion, Anna




  MADDOX, Nancy Ann
    Born: __ Nov 1856 in IN
    Died: 30 Nov 1910 in Macon Co, IL
    Buried: Point Pleasant Cem, Long Creek, Macon Co, IL
    Parents: James B. Lane and Nancy M. McIntosh
    Married: Notley Marion Maddox
    Children: Malina, James E., William T., Dola, Mary, John, Dessie, Arthur and two infant daughters who died young




  MADDOX, Notley Marion
    Born: __ Mar 1855 in KY
    Died: 23 Feb 1915 near Long Creek, Macon Co, IL
    Buried: Point Pleasant Cem, Long Creek, Macon Co, IL
    Parents: Edward and Rhoda (Montgomery) Maddox
    Married: Nancy Ann Lane
    Children: Malina, James E., William T., Dola, Mary, John, Dessie, Arthur and two infant daughters that died young




  MADDOX, Rhoda
    Born: 4 Aug 1822, in KY
    Died: 12 Oct 1894 in Long Creek, Macon Co, IL
    Buried: Mt. Zion Cem, Mt. Zion, Macon Co, IL
    Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Montgomery
    Married: Edward Maddox
    Children: Thomas, Margaret, Sirena, Lucinda, Edward, George, Notley, Sarah, Nancy, James




  MADDOX, Thomas
    Born: 12 Jan 1840 in KY
    Died: 03 Jan 1932
    Buried: Mt. Zion Cem, Mt. Zion, Macon Co, IL
    Parents: Edward and Rhoda (Montgomery) Maddox
    Married: Mary Frances McCormick
    Children: Rhoda, Thomas Jr., Ida, Marion, Anna




  MAFFIT, David A.

D.A. MAFFITS ILLNESS ENDS The Daily Review, 2 Apr 1912

Decatur Man, Leader in Many Activities, Dies

DID MUCH FOR CITY

As Both Private Citizen and Public Official

After many years of illness, D.A. Maffit, president of the Decatur Ice company, died at his home, 1155 Lincoln avenue, at 8:05 oclock Monday evening of Brights disease.

From Friday morning till his death, Mr. Maffit was never more than semi-conscious. He was unconscious twelve hours or more before he died, his astonishing vitality ebbing slowly.

HEALTH FAILS STEADILY

Mr. Maffits death at any time in the last three years would not have been surprising. His illness began with torturing rheumatic seizures nearly twenty years ago, and within a few years evidenced itself as Brights disease. His decline, slow at first, became rapid three years ago and his life was despaired of then. His fighting tenacity, his steady courage, the remains of a marvelous physique, and skilful care pulled him through at that time, and several times afterward when death seemed imminent.

In the last year Mr. Maffit failed steadily. Last June his oldest daughter, Mrs. W.H. Wehmeier, was called from her home, Hanford, Wash., when her father was not expected to live a week. After that his condition was never encouraging enough to permit her to leave. From early last December his life seemed to be a question only of days.

MR. MAFFITS FAMILY

Mr. Maffit on Dec. 15, 1878, married Miss Flora Usrey, daughter of Mrs. William J. Usrey, 515 West Praire avenue. Her father, Captain Usrey, was one of the early newspaper owners and editors of Decatur and was a friend of Abraham Lincoln and was also one of the organizers of the Republican party. Mrs. Maffit died July 28, 1899.

Four children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Maffit, and three are living. They are Robert U. Maffit, Mrs. William H. Wehmeier of Hanford, Wash., and Miss Margaret Maffit of Decatur. The third child was Miss Georiga Maffit, who died on Sept. 6, 1909, from burns sustained when the Maffit house was destroyed.

The Maffit house was one of the famous places in Decatur. It was a center of social activity and its hospitality was proverbial.

The Daily Review (Decatur), 2 Apr 1912

BIG ATTENDANCE AT A FUNERAL

Many Friends of D.A. Maffit at Services

The funeral of D.A. Maffit, held at 3 oclock this afternoon at the First Presbyterian church, was the occasion for a large gathering of his friends. In accordance with Mr. Maffits request, Beaumanoir Commandery, No. 9, Knights Templar, had charge of the services at both the church and the grave. Rev. W.H. Penhallegon, pastor of the First Presbyterian church, was the officiating clergyman.

Honorary pallbearers were O.B. Gorin, J.M. Brownback, W.C. Armstrong, C.M. Imboden, W.H. Starr, John Ullrich, D.S. Shellabarger and Benton Blackstone. Active pallbearers were Davis May, W.L. Shellabarger, J.S. Baldwin, W.H. Spence, H.J. Baldwin and John Allen.

Mrs. William Barnes, Miss Belle Ewing, Mrs. George R. Stanton, Mrs. Theron Powers, William Barnes, and Vere Brownback and charge of the flowers. The interment was in Greenwood.

There are now living only three children of Robert Maffit, who came to Macon county in 1840. They are Mrs. J.N. Cline of Decatur, Mrs. Ellen Williams of San Diego and William A. Maffit of Portland, Ore.

The Daily Review (Decatur), 3 Apr 1912

APT TRIBUTE PAID TO D.A. MAFFIT

Dr. Penhallegon Likens Him to Greatheart

The pen picture of this mans life was drawn centuries before his birth said Rev. W.H. Penhallegon, pastor of the First Presbyterian church at the funeral of D.A. Maffit, Wednesday afternoon. It was drawn by John Bunyan in Pilgrims Progress when he described Mr. Greatheart.

APT TRIBUTE

Dr. Penhallegon thus paid an apt tribute to Mr. Maffit in his brief funeral address. He then proceeded to sketch the qualities which had so endeared D.A. Maffit to everyone who came into any intimate contact with him, his broad interests, his humanness, his sympathy, his sunniness, his loyalty, his sturdiness, his great-heartedness.

He spoke of his recent visits to Mr. Maffit and the several talks he had with him alone when he learned to know and appreciate and admire the real man. He had made no actual church affiliation but he had nevertheless the characteristics which we are justified in calling Christian and he faced the inevitable end with courage and faith and hope. He never gave up the fight and died with his armor on.

HAD MANY FRIENDSHIPS

Mention was made of Mr. Maffits many and diverse friendships. He always kept his great heart young and took special pleasure in the plans and aspirations of young people. His first thought and interest was ever in his family, but he always had room for others. They never lacked a friend and counselor, warm in sympathy, shrewd in advice and kind in criticism.

No man in the city or in the county had more friends. The community is poorer for his loss, said Dr. Penhallegon in conclusion.

There were a number of people present from out of the city at the funeral, among them these being Mrs. John Allen Shauck of Columbus, O., Arthur Alexander of New York city, Mr. and Mrs. Louie _orman of Bloomington and Clifford J. Held of Tuscola.

The relatives present besides the children were Mrs. J.N. Cline, a sister, Miss Alice Shupp, a niece, Miss Elle Usrey, a sister-in-law, Mrs. Ellen Williams of San Diego, Cal., and William A. Maffit of Portland, Ore. A sister and brother could not present nor could William H. Wehmeier of Hanford, Wash., a son-in-law.

The church rostrum was massed with great quantities of beautiful flowers. The different clubs lodges, organizations and interest with which Mr. Maffit had been actively affiliated sent magnificent floral tributes in addition to those send by the many friends.

Walter Busher Shade, organist of Beaumanoir Commandery was at the organ. The Masonic quartet consisting of Charles Imboden, James Spence, Alva Johnson and F. _ White sang Lead Kindly Light, Nearer My God to Thee, and Beautiful Isle of Somewhere, and made the responses during the ritual.

The Daily Review (Decatur), 4 Apr 1912

This obituary included a larger biography. Click here to read Mr. Maffit's biography.





  MAFFIT, Flora (Usrey)

MRS. MAFFIT'S DEATH

Passed Away Tuesday Afternoon at Her Home

SHE HAD A HOST OF FRIENDS

Thoughtful of Others Up to the Very End

Flora Usrey Maffit died at 2:30 o'clock Tuesday afternoon, July 18, at the family residence south of the city. She was in her forty-seventh year. She is survived by her husband, one son, Robert, and three daughters, Leslie, Georgia and Marguerite. She is also survived by her mother, Mrs. William J. Usrey, and a sister, Miss Elle Usrey. Mrs. Maffit's death was caused by a malady known as Addison's disease. She had been afflicted for over three years, and her ailment baffled the skill of the best physicians. She had visited many other cities and had been treated by the most noted specialists, but the relief obtained was but temporary.

HAD A HOST OF FRIENDS

The announcement of the death of Mrs. Maffit was received with expressions of profound regret from all sides. she was perhaps the most widely known woman in the city and numbered her friends by the hundreds. She was born in Decatur, on the site of the Powers Grand opera house. Her life was spent here and nearly everybody knew her and loved her. As a child she was light hearted, jovial, good natured, the sunshine of every youthful gathering. She was quite a society girl and as she grew older she became a leader. She has always occupied an exalted place in Decatur society. She was kind and gentle always, and the friends she made in childhood she retained all through life, a number of the them were with her constantly durin gher illness, and they mourn her death as that of a sister.

NEVER COMPLAINED

She was a devoted wife and mother. She tried to keep the knowledge of her sufferings from the members of her family. She never complained. Those who were with her during her sickness say that at no time have they ever heard her complain. She bore her suffering with a fortitude that is seldom witnessed. It is equally true that she never referred to her approaching end. She knew it was coming, just as well as did the loving friends around her, but she appeared cheerful at all times, and the members of her family were the objuects of her care and consideration to the very last. Every possible attention was shown her and every effort made to prolong her life, though all knew it was but the question of a very short time until death would claim her. And when the end did come, the community was bowed in sorrow. Her loss will be felt in many homes in Decatur. She was a charitable woman. The arrangements for the funeral have not been completed. The time and place will be announced later.

The Daily Review (Decatur), 19 Jul 1899





  MAFFIT, Georgia Corwin

BORN IN DECATUR

Miss Maffit Was Woman of Charm and Ability

Miss Maffit was the daughter of David A. Maffit, president of the Decatur Ice Company. She was born in Decatur twenty-four year ago. Her mother, Mrs. Flora Usrey Maffit, died ten years ago. After her schooling in Decatur, Miss Maffit went to Harcourt college, Gambler, O.

Miss Maffit was a young woman of charm and ability. Coming from parents that were prominent in Decatur all their lives, she was a social leader. She leaves her father, her two sisters and one brother, Robert U. Maffit of Decatur, her grandmother, Mrs. Usrey, widow of Capt. W.J. Usrey, and two aunts, Miss Elle Usrey of Decatur, and Mrs. James Cline of Cowden.

Mrs. Wehmeier, who was badly burned, is the wife of William H. Wehmeier of Hanford, Wash. She has been here since July visitjng her father and sisters. Mrs. Shauck is the wife of John A. Shauck, a justice in the supreme court of Ohio. Judge Shauck arrived at noon today.

PLANS FOR FUNERAL

The body of Miss Maffitt was removed to the undertaking establishment of Monson & Wilcox and prepared for burial. Wednesday morning the body will be removed to the home of her grandmother, Mrs. Mary J. Usrey, 615 W. Prairie avenue, where the funeral will be held at 2:30 Wednesday afternoon. The casket will not be opened at any time.

Dr. Joseph Miller of York, Pa., a cousin of D.A. Maffitt, will be here. Mrs. Golden Danely Slaughter of Paris will get here tonight, and Mr. and Mrs. Louis Forman of Bloomington will also arrive tonight.

The Daily Review (Decatur), 7 Sep 1909

Read the complete story about this terrible tragedy!





  MAGAN, Henry C.   

Henry C. Magan, an old soldier from the home at Danville who has been around Decatur nearly all this week, was found dead at Wyckles switch, four miles west of Decatur, Thrusday afternoon. About 3 o’clock Mrs. J. R. Blanford saw the old man lying on a pile of lumber under the drive of J.A. Roney’s elevator. She thought he was only sleeping and said nothing about it until her husband returned home an hour later. Then she mentioned the fact to Mr. Blanford, and he went over to the elevator and found that the old man was dead. There were no marks of violence about the body and he appeared to have died naturally. Coroner Buxton was notified and went out at 5 o’clock and had the body brought to Moran’s undertaking establishment.

Papers on his person indicated that Magan had been in the Soldiers’ Home at Danville. He had a furlough allowing him thirty days leave of absence from April 18, the date of his death. He must have received the furlough the first of the week, for he was drunk in Decatur Tuesday. He was locked up that night and the next morning Justice McCoy fined him $3 and costs, a total of $4.50. After paying his fine he had $11.30 left. Wednesday night he was found asleep in the Powers building and was again locked up. Thursday morning he was released without paying a fine.

J.A. Roney saw the old man lying on the boards about 10 o’clock Thursday morning, but supposed he was asleep. He must have been dead several hours when found. There was no money on his person and even the pocketbook in which he carried his money was missing.

Coroner Buxton held an inquest at 9 o’clock Friday morning at Moran’s chapel, and the verdict was that death was due to unknown causes. The authorities at the Soldier’s home were notified of the death. It is not yet known what disposition will be made of the body. Magan was about sixty-five years old.

The Daily Review, Decatur IL, 19 Apr 1907, pg. 12





  MAGEE, Clyde

Clyde, infant son of Mr and Mrs William T. Magee, died at 7:30 a.m. Sunday, December 20, of lung trouble, at the family residence, 922 East North street. The funeral was held at 2:30 o'clock yesterday afternoon from the residence. The services were conducted by Rev. M.B. Spayd of the U.B. church. The interment was at Greenwood.

Decatur Daily Review, 22 December 1896





  MAGEE, John

John Magee, an old resident in this county, died yesterday morning at 11:30 at the home of his son, W.J. Magee, steward at the poor farm. He was born in Delaware in 1808, came to Moultrie county in 1842, thence to Springfield and thence to Macon county. He has been a constable in Whitmore township for over 40 years. His wife is still living, at the age of 74 years. His children are W.J. Magee, Mrs. George Barnett and Mrs. Samuel Garver. The funeral will be at noon to-day from Fairview church.

Decatur Morning Review, 12 Sep 1890





  MAGNER, James   

James Magner died about noon Wednesday in St. Mary’s hospital. Old age and a complication of diseases caused his death. Mr. Magner was almost 81 years old. He was one of the old residents, having lived in Decatur forty-five or fifty years. He was born in Ireland. He enlisted from Decatur and fought on the union side during the Civil war. He was a member of St. Patrick’s Catholic church, from which the funeral will be held.

He leaves two daughters, Mrs. Robert Wiseman of Chicago, and Josephine Magner of Decatur. Mr. Magner had been ill about four years before his death.

The Daily Review, Decatur IL, 23 Mar 1904

NOTE: A description of the funeral was published in The Daily Review, Decatur IL, 25 Mar 1904.





  MAHAN, James   

A member of Celestial Lodge, No. 86, I.O.O.F., James Mahan, aged about 42 years, died of dropsy of the heart, at his late residence in this city, north west corner of East Eldorado and Edward streets, on last evening at seven o’clock, after an illness of about four weeks. Deceased leaves a wife and three boys, the youngest 4 years and the oldest 10. The deceased, who was a first-class harness maker, came to Decatur about 18 months ago from Indianapolis, and was employed at J. G. Starr & Sons establishment.

The funeral will take place on Friday, Nov. 19th, at 2 p.m.

Decatur Weekly Republican, Decatur IL, 25 Nov 1880, pg. 7





  MAHANNAH, Ed

Ed Mahannah died Monday afternoon at his home, two miles north of Casner, of diptheria, aged 22 years. The deceased was a son of Henry Mahannah and was well known in Decatur. His only child died about three months ago. The wife is left. The funeral was held from the residence at 1 o'clock yesterday afternoon. Rev. Gifford conducted the service. The burial was at Long Creek cemetery.

The Daily Review, Decatur, IL, 29 Mar 1893





  MAHANNAH, Capt. Harvey   
HARVEY MAHANNAH, OLD RESIDENT, DIES

Captain of Company in 116th Regiment

WAS IN EVERY BATTLE

Slightly Wounded At Missionary Ridge

Captain Harvey Mahannah died at 2:45 Tuesday morning at the family residence, 382 East Center street. He was almost seventy-nine years old. He had been in failing health for over a year, suffering from a complication of diseases. For several weeks he had been suffering with asthma.

SETTLED AT MT. ZION

Captain Mahannah was born Aug 12, 1836 in Washington county, Pa., The family moved to Ohio in 1839, and he came to Macon county in 1851, settling near Mr. Zion. His father had been a farmer and he followed that life for some time, interworking as a carpenter. He moved to Decatur in 1856. He was working as a carpenter in Louisiana when trouble between the north and south started and the people of the south began to make it unpleasant for northern sympathizers.

KEPT ENGAGEMENT

Mr. Mahannah kept his sentiments to himself. In telling about it later, he said that he and Miss Mary T. Swift were engaged to be married before he went to Louisiana, and he decided that if he was ever to keep that engagement, he had better go back north while the going was good. Part of the trip he made on a train with confederate soldiers, and he got back to Decatur in time to marry Miss Swift on June 30, 1861. They celebrated their golden wedding anniversary in June 1911.

ORDERLY SERGEANT

Aug. 12, 1862, Mr. Mahannah enlisted as an orderly sergeant in company G, of the 116th Illinois volunteer infantry, made up largely of Macon county men, and the regiment first went into camp at the old fairgrounds west of town, now Fairview park. While the regiment was still in camp there, he was commissioned first lieutenant.

HIT BY BULLET

Fifty years later, in May 1912, he received from the government the pay for that first month’s service as a soldier. He received his captain’s commission at Larkinsville, Ala, in 1861. He was hit by a bullet during the battle of Missionary Ridge, but was only slightly wounded. He had only one attack of illness during the entire war and was in the hospital but a short time. He was on every march taken by his regiment except one, and took part in every battle in which his regiment was engaged. He marched with Sherman to the sea, and was in the last battle in North Carolina. The regiment was mustered out at Washington June 29, 1865, and finally discharged at Camp Butler.

BUILT A HOME

After the war, Captain Mahannah returned to Decatur and worked as a carpenter for many years. Over forty years ago he built the home in which the family has since resided at 382 East Center street. He served the township as a member of the board of highway commissioners and has always been considered one of the city’s substantial citizens. He was a member of the Congregational church, Macon Lodge No. 8, A.F.& A.M. and of Dunham Post No. 141, G.A.R. He is survived by his wife and one son, Stephen U. Mahannah, of Decatur. The body was removed to the Dawson undertaking establishment and prepared for burial.

Arrangements for the funeral have not been completed, but it will probably be held Thursday, and will be under the auspices of the Masons and the Grand Army of the Republic. The interment will be in Greenwood.

The Daily Review, Decatur, IL - 27 Jul 1915 (also, date of death)

The funeral of Captain Harvey Mahannah was held at 2:30 o'clock Thursday afternoon at the First Congregational church. There was a large attendance, the Masons and old soldiers attending in a body. The church was filled with friends. The services were conducted by Rev. Frank Fox, pastor of the church, and were under the auspices of Macon lodge No. 8, A.F. & A.M., and Dunham post, 141 G.A.R. The old soldiers conducted their ritualistic exercises at the church, and the Masons conducted theirs at the grave.

The music was furnished by Alva Johnson, W. Elmer White, J.O. Spence and R.C. Augustine. The floral tributes were many and were in charge of Mrs. W.L. Augustine, Mrs. E.O. Shiveley and Mrs. H.O. Gill. The honorary pallbearers were Daniel Moore, W.S. Turpin, J.A. Cochran, Luther Barnard, W.N. Lanham and E.T. Willoughby, all members of Dunham post. The active pallbearers were Herbert C. Bush, E.D. Conrad, A.L. Ambuhl, George B. Marshall, F.E. Smith and D.J. Lewellen, all members of Macon lodge No. 8, A.F. and A.M. The interment was in Greenwood.

The Daily Review, Decatur, IL, 30 Jul 1915





  MAHANNAH, Henry
DEATH AT CASNER

The little son of Henry Mahannah died Thursday morning at the family residence at Casner, aged 4 years. The funeral will be held Friday morning.

The Weekly Herald Despatch, Decatur, IL, 4 Mar 1893





  MAHANNAH, Mary
MARY MAHANNAH DIES AT AGE 80

Had Been In Ill Health For Two Years

Mrs. Mary T. Mahannah, widow of Harvey Mahannah, long well-known residents of Decatur, died Thursday morning at the home of Mrs. Lee Geddes, three miles northwest of Decatur on Boiling Springs road. She was practically eighty years old at the time of her death and had been in poor health for about two years or more.

She was born in Marion, Ind., on May 29, 1842 and came to Decatur about sixty-five years ago. In 1862, she was married to Harvey Mahannah, who was a captain of Co. H, 116 Illinois Volunteer Infantry in the Civil War. Three children were born to them, one dying in infancy and a second, Sarah Mahannah, died some years ago.

The third and surviving child is Steve Mahannah, who was with her at the time of her death and who is rather prominent here in political circles. She is also survived by two sisters, Mrs. Jesse Craig of Nort Port, Wash., and Mrs. Hannah Peters of Sedee, Okla. She was a member of the Congregational church. The body was brought to the Monson and Wilcox undertaking parlors for burial.

Decatur Review, 17 Feb 1922

The funeral of Mrs. Mary T. Mahannah, widow of Captain Harvey Mahannah, will be held at 2:30 o'clock Sunday afternoon at the Monson & Wilcox chapel.

Decatur Review, 18 Feb 1922





  MAHANNAH, Mary

Mrs. Mary Mahannah, 94, former resident of Decatur, died Saturday night, in St. Vincent's hospital following a lingering decline in health. Mrs. Mahannah was the widow of Steven Mahannah and was born and raised in Macon county. She had lived in Taylorville for the past three years.

Funeral arrangements are incomplete but burial will probably be in Mt. Zion cemetery.

Decatur Evening Herald, Decatur, IL, 13 Jan 1929





  MAHANNAH, Stephen

Stephen Mahannah died at his late residence in Mt. Zion township at midnight Saturday. His illness was neuralgia of the heart. His disease developed on Sunday last when he had a severe fainting spell from which he revived with difficulty. On Thursday last a second fainting spell was very severe, and his attendants were obliged to work with him for a long time before he was restored to consciousness. He seemd to grow better again and on Saturday appeared better than the day before until about half an hour before his death.

The deceased was in his 59th year. He came to this country from Washington county, Pa., in 1851. He was twice married. The only child by his first wife if Mrs. I.R. Mills, of Decatur. After remaining a widower four or five years Mr. Mahannah was married in 1862 to his second wife. No children were born to them.

The brothers of the deceased are Henry Mahannah, of Mt. Zion; Harvey Mahannah, of Decatur; Eli Mahannah, of Colorado; Jacob Mahannah, of Witchita, Kan., and James Mahannah, of Oberlin, Kan. Mrs. Maria Latham, of Sedgwick, Kan., is his sister. Telegrams have been sent to those living at a distance.

Saturday Herald, Decatur, IL, 23 Jul 1887





  MAHER, Edward   

Edward Maher, for the past 47 years a resident of Decatur, died at St. Mary’s hospital at 2 o’clock this morning of hemorrhage of the brain. His aged wife is also lying at the point of death at the hospital, where the couple were taken on Tuesday of this week.

Mr. Mayer’s remains were taken to this late residence at 827 North Morgan street and the funeral will be held from St. Patrick’s church on Saturday morning at 9:30 o’clock. Rev. Father Kelley will celebrate high mass. Burial will be at Cavalry.

The deceased was born in county Tipperary, Ireland, in 1829. He came to . America when 23 years of age, coming direct to Decatur, where he has since resided. He was an old soldier, having been a member of Company B., 116th Illinois Volunteers. He was employed in the Wabash yards for a number of years, but for the past nine years has been retired.

He is survived by his wife, one child, Mrs. C.R. Couryan, and five grandchildren living at Ivesdale and two sisters, Mrs. A.N. Condon of Decatur and another living in Ireland. He was a member of St. Patrick’s church.

The Daily Republican, Decatur IL, 14 Jul 1899





  MAJOR, Chester A.   

The funeral of Chester A. Major, who died in Chicago Sunday, will be held here at 1 o’clock Thursday afternoon. The funeral services will be under the direction of the Masons and American Legion, of which orders he was a member.

Decatur Review, Decatur IL, 26 Dec 1922

The funeral of Chester A. Major was held Thursday afternoon at his father’s home in Warrensburg. The sermon was preached by Rev. Gordon Waggoner. The pallbearers were Chester Baker, J. M. Schroeder, Russ Williard, J. M. Fyman and Clifford Keister and Wilbur Culp all belonging to the Masonic order. About 16 members of the American Legion also accompanied the body to Harristown.

There were many beautiful floral offerings a big truck lad and a car full which were in charge of Mrs. Ray Major, Miss Jennie Mizell, Mrs. Jesse Baker, Mrs. Earl Major, Mrs. Dit Noel, Mrs. Ross Willard and Miss Anna Tuttle.

Relatives and friends from out of town were Mr. and Mrs. Harry Christopher and little daughter of Washington Pa, Lawrence Major of South Bend Ind, Mrs. and Mrs. John Burrus and Mr. and Mrs. Matthew Burrus all of Dawson Ill, Mrs. Sallie Rayborn of Concord Ill, Mr. and Mrs. Tom Anderson Washington D.C., John W. Major of Peoria and Mrs. Rea??? Of Chicago, Mr. Connelison & brother Mason of Chicago accompanied the body.

The music was furnished by Mrs. David Faith, Mrs. A.A. Mertz, J.E. Hursh and Baxter Brown. The interment was in the Harristown cemetery.

Decatur Review, Decatur IL, 30 Dec 1922, pg. 4





  MALESKA, Max John
    Born: 21 Nov 1889
    Died: 10 Mar 1949 in Decatur, Macon Co, IL
    Buried: Lutheran Cem.
    Parents:
    Married:
    Children:




  MANION, Sadie
    Born: 19 May 1859 in South Burwick, Maine
    Died: 4 Oct 1926 in Kankakee
    Buried:
    Parents:
    Married: 1884 to James S. Manion in Decatur
    Children: Hugh, Burt




  MANLEY, Jacob W.   

Jacob W. Manley of Maroa died at 3:25 o’clock Thursday morning at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Cordie Sheets in Decatur. He was eighty-five years old.

Mr. Manley was born in Turledge, Tenn, Apr. 14, 1843. He came to Illinois when he was twenty-one years old and most of his life was spent on a farm five miles east of Maroa. He was married three times. He and Hiss Elizabeth Letter were married Sept. 22, 1876. Her death occurred Oct. 26, 1886. He and Miss Mary Huffman of Clinton were married Sept. 12, 1888. She died in April, 1893. Mr. Manley’s third wife was Miss Mary Cramley of Centralia. They were married Dec. 28, 1898. She died June 1, 1922. Eight children were born to the first marriage and two to the second. All but one of the children are living. They are Mrs. Slider and Mrs. James Cade of Houston, Tex., A. R. Manley of Pekin, Mrs. Joseph Schultz of Maroa, C.L. Manley of Twin Falls, Ida., Mrs. Thomas Lancaster and Mrs. Henry Luckenbill of Maroa, and Mrs. Ruth Parr of Argenta.

The funeral will be held at 2:30 o’clock Sunday afternoon at the Presbyterian church in Maroa. The burial will be in the Maroa cemetery.

Decatur Daily Review, Decatur IL, 20 Apr 1928, pg. 6





  MANSFIELD, Fannie A. (Starr)

Died, at her residence in this city, on Tuesday, wife of Mr. J.L. Mansfield, aged 40 years 3 months and 17 days. Mrs. Mansfield was born in Brownville, Jefferson county, New York. Her maiden name was Starr, and she was married at the early age of 16.

Her sudden death has sent a thrill of horror and grief throughout our entire community. She was known to all by her good works, her kindly words, and her active sympathies for the poor and afflicted. No appeal of the suffering or needy was ever passed by unheeded by her, yet, in her home along, and by those who knew her best was she fully appreciated.

Though a woman of strong feeling and quick impulse, one who lived in her family as a servant three years, has often said, that she never saw Mrs. Mansfield out of patience or ever heard a harsh or angry word pass her lips, but the ever kind "We must try and do better next time" was the severest reply administered to those who disobeyed or wronged her. She was a most tender mother and devoted wife, and her uniform kindness and thoughtful regard for the welfare of others made her an invaluable neighbor. Left an orphan at the tender age of five years, she learned by sad experience the need of kind words and encouragement to those whom death had deprived of a mother's care, and every child she met knew her as the childrens friend and defender. Her pure unselfishness was the most marked feature of her _, always (rest of sentence is unreadable). (Beginning of sentence is unreadable) good of others and never _ to have thought of self. If "by their works ye shall know them" is the guide to our judgment of her life as a Christian, no more faithful follower of the lowly Jesus have we ever known.

Truly may we say of here that, "She stretcheth forth her hand to the poor, yea, she reacheth forth her hand to the needy." Her children arise up and call her blessed; her husband also and he praiseth her.

Decatur Weekly Gazette, 30 September 1864





  MARCH, Elizabeth

WENT AFTER AX; FOUND WOMAN DEAD

Mrs. Elizabeth March, Aged 60, Succumbs Suddenly

The death of Mrs. Elizabeth March, 332 Wabash avenue, was discovered at 7:30 Thursday morning when V.P. Meridith, who was working in the lumber yard across from the house, went to borrow an ax and found Mrs. March lying in her easy chair in the sitting room with her head neatly touching the floor.

Coroner Elmer Brintlinger held an inquest over the body Thursday morning in which the jury found death to have resulted from natural causes, probably heart trouble. The body was taken to the Moran undertaking establishment where funeral services will be held Friday afternoon.

HEARD A CRY

Mrs. March was about sixty years of age and has lived in Decatur most of her life. She was last seen alive by Mrs. Inez Ware, a neighbor, who talked with her Wednesday evening, while Mrs. March was sitting on her porch. Mrs. Ware testified that she seemed normal at that time. She also testified to having heard a cry about 4 o'clock Thursday morning which might have come from Mrs. March. She did not investigate this at the time.

HAD NO RELATIVES

Mrs. March had no immediate family. Her husband, Stanley March, was killed a few years ago, while working on the street for the city, and her only daughter died three years ago.

The Daily Review (Decatur), 13 May 1915

The funeral of Mrs. Elizabeth March was held at 4 o'clock Friday afternoon at Moran's chapel. The services were conducted by Rev. F.M. Smith, pastor of the First Presbyterian church. The music was furnished by Mrs. Corydon C. Nicholson and Mrs. W. Roy Essick. The pallbearers were I.J. Chronister, F.C. Kearnes, G.W. Culp, V.H. Chronister, Albert Cain and Paul Meridith. The interment was in Greenwood.

The Daily Review (Decatur), 15 May 1915





  MARCH, Mary

Mary March died Monday, March 24th, at the home of her mother, Mrs. Lizzie March, 508 Condit street, of lung trouble, aged 19 years. The funeral arrangements will be announced later.

Decatur Herald, 25 Mar 1902





  MARCH, Maude E. (Shaddock)
    Born: 26 Jan 1879 in Macon, Macon Co, IL
    Died: 5 Feb 1927 in Decatur, Macon Co, IL
    Buried: Macon Cem, Macon Co, IL
    Parents: James & Jemima J. (Atteberry) Shaddock
    Married: 7 Apr 1908 in Macon Co, IL to Wm. D. March
    Children:




  MARCH, Stanley

SAID HIS SISTER DIED

At That Instant March Was Buried Alive

TWELVE FEET UNDER GROUND

People Crowd About and Make Another Cave In

Stanley March, _ , living at 508 East Condit street, met with a horrible death this morning. While working in a new sewer trench near the corner of North Main and Packard streets, the holes caved in and he was crushed and killed. The body was not extracted until two hours later.

The accident happened at _ 10 o'clock. Two other men were working with March. They were Jerry Stewart of 612 East Condit street and Charles Kershner of 1629 North Morgan street.

THE PLACE

The place where the men were working was _ a short one which runs behind the grocery store of S.S. Allsup and extends for half a block from North Main street to the _ between Main and Water street. Mr. Allsup had started to _ sewer tie to run from his store to the main sewer in the alley. The work was begun in the alley and a narrow trench about three feet wide had been dug from the _ west a distanct of about twenty-five feet.

It was in this trench that March met his end. He was laying tile in the bottom which was _ twelve feet from the surface of the ground. No one else was in the trench, but A.C. Spence, a clerk in Allsup's store was on the bank having a conversation with March and watching the progress of the work.

TAKING OF SISTER'S DEATH

March was talking of the death of his sister, Mrs. Sarah Boone, which occurred this morning. Spencer asked the cause of death and March said his sister had suffered with a cancer and had been for a long time. Spencer remarked to one of the men on top that he would not like to work at the bottom of _ it might cave and and almost at that moment the sides gave way and (rest of sentence is unreadable). The sides crumbled and entirely covered the unfortunate man. He screamed as the cave in happened and his _ were _ times after he was covered.

DIGGING

Others were called to assist in getting the man out and soon quite a crowd of people gathered. J._ Marshall, their _ for the Central Mutual Telephone comany was working nearby and he helped to dig. The earth was shoveled away until March's face and _ _ was exposed. It was thought that _ little _ was _ at that time. A. rope was tied around his _ him up.

Immediately, Dr. N.D. Myers was summoned and a message was sent to police headquarters. Officers Sullivan and Kossick took the patrol wagon and made a flying trip to the scene of the accident. Officer Sullivan took charge of things.

ANOTHER CAVE IN

(Next several paragraphs are nearly unreadable. Apparently onlookers and those working to free Mr. March caused another cave in an it took two hours to free Mr. March from the bottom of the trench. During this time Deptuy Coroner Roy Bendure, Chief Applegate, and undertaker J. Bullard arrived.)

HIS WIFE COMES

While the men were working, Mrs. March, wife of the man who was killed, had been notified of the accident and came to the place where it had happened. She walked to the edge of the trench and looking down, said: "Stanley, why did you fall into that hole?"

She seemed greatly affected with grief and was urged to go into a neighboring house but she insisted on going back to her own home.

When the dirt had been removed the body was lifted up and placed in the patrol wagon and was taking to the Bullard undertaking establishment.

THE RESPONSIBILITY

There seemed to be no one in particular to be blamed for the accident. The dirt was soft _ of the damp weather and with the weight of the dirt which had been thrown up from the trench the banks simply gave way. The place where the sewer was being laid had evidently been _ neighboring buildings were erected and of course it was quicker to give way than if it had been in a place which had never before been excavated.

MARCH'S FAMILY

March was aged about 56 years. He was a molder by trade but has for a long time past been engaged as a ditcher and was often employed in different parts of the city in such work. He leaves a wife and an adopted daughter 14 years old, and was in poor circumstances.

His sister, Mrs. Satah Boone, died at an early hour this morning. One of Mrs. Boone's sons was sent for and went with the body when it was removed.

March was a veteran of the civil war and was a member of Dunham Post, No. 141 G.A.R. He was quite well known about the city, having lived and worked in Decatur for a long time. An inquest will be held by the coroner. No funeral arrangements have yet been made.

The Daily Review (Decatur), 27 Nov 1899





  MARFREY, R.M.

In Oakley, on Wednesday, Jan. 27th, R.M. Mahfrey. Mr. M. leaves a wife and several children, besides a large circle of friends and acquaintances to mourn his loss. The funeral services are to take place today.

Daily Republican, Decatur, IL, 28 Jan 1875





  MARKLE, James   

Coroner Leon Monson was called to Warrensburg, Wednesday, by the sudden death of James Markle, carrier on rural route No. 2. He dropped dead in the Warrensburg postoffice about 9:15 o’clock Wednesday morning as he was getting ready to go out on his route. Heart trouble was the cause of his death.

Mr. Markle was about sixty years old and was an old time resident of Warrensburg. He is survived by two children, Mrs. Charles Janvrin of near Warrensburg, and Frank Markle of Terre Haute, and one brother living in Terre Haute. He lived by himself, his wife being dead.

The inquest was held at 3 o’clock this afternoon.

The Daily Review, Decatur IL, 21 Feb 1917

NTOE: A description of the funeral was published in The Daily Review, Decatur Illinois, 24 Feb 1917.





  MARSH, Ann (Sloan)
    Born: 1796 in Ireland
    Died: 15 Oct 1862 in Argenta,Macon Co,IL
    Buried: Friends Creek Cem, Macon Co, IL
    Parents:
    Married: Jesse Marsh
    Children:




  MARSH, Charles Herbert
    Born: 3 April 1887 in Maroa, Macon Co, IL
    Died: 10 Feb 1982 in Macon Co, IL
    Buried: Maroa Cem, Macon Co, IL
    Parents:
    Married:
    Children:




  MARSH, Ella Victoria (Ray) Shields
    Born: 27 June 1853 in Troy, Lincoln Co, MO
    Died: 23 Oct 1925 in Maroa, Macon Co, IL
    Buried: Maroa Cem, Macon Co, IL
    Parents:
    Married:
    Children:




  MARSH, Henrietta Jane (Sherman)
    Born: Oct 1824 in Warren Co, OH
    Died: Feb 1863 in Piatt Co, IL
    Buried: Ater Cem, Piatt Co, IL
    Parents:
    Married:
    Children:




  MARSH, Janie Mae (Stogsdill)
    Born: 11 Nov.1900 in Orchardville, Wayne Co, IL
    Died: 20 Aug 1988 in Macon Co, IL
    Buried: Maroa Cem, Macon Co, IL
    Parents:
    Married:
    Children:




  MARSH, Jesse
    Born: May 1797 in NJ
    Died: 10 Jan in Warren Co, OH
    Buried: Greenwood cem. near Lebanonin, Warren Co, Ohio
    Parents:
    Married:
    Children:




  MARSH, Jesse
    Born: 28 March 1857 in Piatt Co, IL
    Died: Aug 1928 in Maroa, Macon Co, IL
    Buried: Maroa Cem, Macon Co, IL
    Parents:
    Married:
    Children:




  MARSH, John
    Born: 12 July 1823 in Warren Co, OH
    Died: 15 June 1896 in Maroa, Macon Co, IL
    Buried: Maroa Cem, Macon Co, IL
    Parents:
    Married:
    Children:




  MARSHALL, Nora A.

Mrs. Nora A. Marshall, wife of R.E. Marshall, died at 8:50 Thursday morning at the family residence, 537 East Bradford street. She was 29 years old. Her death was caused by puerperal fever. She is survived by her husband and three small children.

The Daily Review, Decatur, IL, 9 Dec 1909

The funeral of Mrs. Nora A. Marshall will be held at 2 o'clock Saturday afternoon from the church at Harristown. The funeral party will leave the residence, 537 East Bradford street, in Decatur, at 1 o'clock and take a special interurban car. The interment will be at the Harristown cemetery.

The Daily Review, Decatur, IL, 10 Dec 1909

The funeral of Mrs. Nora A. Marshall will be held at 2 o'clock Sunday afternoon at the Methodist church in Harristown. The funeral party will leave the corner of Water and Bradford streets in a special interurgan car at 1 o'clock.

The Daily Review, Decatur, IL, 11 Dec 1909





  MARTIN, Albert   

Died, in this city yesterday, of disease of the heart, Albert Martin, aged 43 years. Mr. Martin was a highly educated and intelligent German, and had his health permitted, was competent to fill the highest positions in business life. He served credibly during the late war, and died regretted by all who knew him. His remains were interred this forenoon, with military honors, a large escort of his old companions in arms following the body to the grave. -- The German Turners, of which the deceased was a worthy member, also attended the funeral in a body.

Decatur Review, 23 Jun 1870





  MARTIN, Drucilla J. (Greenfield)
    Born: 20 Sep 1853 in Macon Co, IL
    Died: 16 Feb 1885
    Buried:
    Parents:
    Married:
    Children:




  MARTIN, George   

George “Sabe” Martin died suddenly Monday afternoon at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Edward Martin, 154 South Calhoun street. He was twenty-eight years old last May. Heart trouble is thought to have been the cause of his death.

Mr. Martin had not been in good health and Monday afternoon he was lying on the couch when his mother went down town to do some shopping. When she returned about 5 o’clock she found him lying on the floor beside the couch. A physician was called and said that the young man had been dead for perhaps an hour.

Mr. Martin was born May 15, 1896. He was a veteran of the World war, having served overseas with major Lutz Krigbaum. He was injured while in the service and had not enjoyed good health since the close of the war. He leaves a brother, Harlow Martin, and a sister Ruth Yoder.

The body was removed to the Moran & Sons undertaking establishment and prepared for burial.

The Decatur Daily Republican, Decatur IL, 28 Oct 1924





  MARTIN, John Andrew

John Andrew Martin died in his home, 1113 North Jordan street at 2:10 o'clock Wednesday morning. He suffered three paralytic strokes, the last of which occurred two weeks ago. He was born Sept. 19, 1852 in Chambersburg, Pa., but had made his home in Decatur for the past 20 years. He leaves his wife, Anna Martin and the following children, all of Decatur; Lou, Carl, Carmie, George, Dewey, Russell, Bessie and Flossie. he also leaves one brother, George M. Martin in New Jersey and 22 grandchildren.

The body will remain in the home until funeral time. Services will be conducted in the Moran & Sons chapel at 10 o'clock Friday morning. Burial will be in Peck cemetery near Cerro Gordo.

Decatur Evening Herald, 3 Oct 1928





  MARTIN, Peter   

Peter Martin was found dead in his bed at 5 o’clock Saturday morning at his home, 1551 North Church street. He had been ill for three days of congestion of the stomach but when he retired at 9 o’clock Friday he was feeling better and seemed to be improved. His son, Charles found Mr. Martin dead in bed Saturday morning.

Peter Martin was born in Ashland O., March 30, 1836, and came to Illinois in 1867, and was engaged in the shoe business at Macon until the spring of 1894, when he came to Decatur to live. He was married to Artilla A. McGown in 1868. Mrs. Martin died last February.

Mr. Martin is survived by two sons, William M. and Charles E. Martin and five grandchildren. He served five years in the civil war and was a veteran of Company H, Forty-ninth Ohio Volunteers and was a Mason and also a member of the G.A.R.

The funeral will be held from the residence at 2 o’clock Monday afternoon and will be in charge of Macon Lodge No. 8, A.F. and A.M.

Coroner Dawson held an inquest Saturday afternoon and the verdict was that Mr. Martin’s death was due to heart trouble superinduced by rheumatism.

Decatur Herald, Decatur IL, 2 May 1903, pg. 3





  MARTIN, William

The funeral of William Martin, an old, prominent and highly respected citizen of this city, took place at the residence of Dr. H.C. Johns, in the southeast part of the city, Rev. W.H. Prestley, pastor of the First Presbyterian church officiating. The attendance was very large. The sermon, from the text: "For I know that thou wilt bring me to death and to the house appointed for all living," was a very able and instructive one. From his memoir of the deceased we learn that Mr. Martin was born in Pennsylvania, June 6, 1800, being 79 years old at the time of his death. He moved to Circleville, Ohio, when a lad, and in the course of a few years he engaged in pork packing and general merchandising, sending his produce in flat boats to New Orleans, where he had an extensive branch commission house. In 1849 he moved to Piatt county, this state, where he invested his property in farm lands, also engaging extensively in the cattle trade. In 1858, previous to which time he assisted in building the Presbyterian church here, being one of its most liberal contributors, and taking an active interest in its prosperity.

He enjoyed a remarkable degree the respect and confidence of all our citizens, for he was a man of indomitable energy, strict integrity, upright walk, genial disposition, and generous to a fault. He leaves three children to mourn his death - Mrs. Dr. Johns, of Decatur, William Martin, of Wheatland, and Henry Martin of Forsythe.

The funeral cortege was one of the largest ever seen in the city. The pall bearers were: Judge Green, Joseph Michl, Jasper J. Peddecord, Samuel Powers, Isaac Shellabarger, and E. McClellan.

Decatur Review, 7 April 1879





  MARTIN, Willis K.   

Willis K. Martin, a well-known citizen of the county, died of lockjaw at Mr. Zion on Friday afternoon, having stepped on a rusty nail four days ago. The deceased was a veteran soldier, having served in the Union army as a private in Co. H, 89th Ill. Regt., and it was his request that the comrades of Dunham Post No. 141, G.A.R. bury him with the honors of the order. The funeral will occur on Sunday, when members of the Post will go to Mt. Zion in hacks and conduct the interment. The deceased leaves a family.

Decatur Daily Republican, Decatur IL, 5 Sep 1885, pg. 3





  MASSEY, David   

David Massey died at his home in Niantic about 3 o’clock Monday morning. Death was due to rheumatism of the heart. Mr. Massey was born in Ohio about eighty years ago. He was an old soldier and member of the G.A.R.

Mr. Massey leaves the following children: Mrs. D.W. Shipman of Decatur, Mrs. Sarah Proise of Ducktall, Neb, Mrs. Flora Weaver of Carbondale, Ill., and Theodore Massey of Decatur. The body was taken to the Dawson and Wikoff undertaking establishment and prepared for burial and the funeral probably will be held some time Wednesday morning. Interment will be in the Keller cemetery, south of Lovington.

Decatur Daily Review, Decatur IL, 20 Jun 1921

NOTE: An obituary published in the Decatur Daily Review on 21 Jun 1921 said that the funeral was at 10 o’clock at the Dawson & Wikoff chapel in Decatur and that the interment was in Greenwood cemetery.





  MASTERSON, John H.   

John H. Masterson, a painter and paper hanger died at 9 a.m. Wednesday Oct 2 at the family home 1104 East Herkimer street aged 61 years. He is survived by a wife and four sons and a daughter who lives in Colorado.

The funeral will be held Saturday at 3:39 o’clock from the residence and the burial will be at Greenwood cemetery.

The Daily Review, Decatur IL, 3 Oct 1901

NOTE: A description of the funeral was published in The Daily Review, Decatur IL, 7 Oct 1901.





  MATHIAS, Jacob

Mr. Jacob Mathias, of Boody, died last night of small-pox and was buried in a few hours afterwards. We are informed that the cases of the disease which have occurred are of a very malignant type, and it will stand people in hand to protect themselves thoroughly by vaccination.

Daily Republican, Decatur, IL, 19 Jan 1875

Dr. Mills informs us that the family of Jacob Mathias, at Boody, is in a very destitute condition. The father and mother both died of smallpox, and the nine children, ranging from seventeen to five years of age, have all had the disease and recovered. They are in dire need of clothing, and everything else, and while we are sending off supplied to the needy in Kansas it would be well to remember that "Charity begins at home." Anything left with Dr. Mills, or at his office, will be forwarded to the family.

Daily Republican, Decatur, IL, 16 Jan 1875





  MATHIAS, Mrs. Jacob

~ Death From Small-Pox ~ Mrs. Jacob Mathias, who was taken with the small-pox a week or two since, died yesterday at her house in Boody. The disease had got too far advanced before a physican was called, and the best medical treatment could not save her life. The body was buried yesterday afternoon so as to prevent the spread of the disease in the little village.

Daily Republican, Decatur, IL, 15 Jan 1875





  MATHIAS, Frank
    Born: 3 Jul 1864
    Died: 27 Mar 1952 in Decatur, Macon Co, IL
    Buried: Union Cem., Macon Co, IL
    Parents:
    Married: 3 Aug 1886 in Macon Co, IL to Laura Querry
    Children:




  MATHIAS, Laura (Querry)
    Born: 7 May 1868 in Oreana, Macon Co, IL
    Died: 8 Jul 1921 in Decatur, Macon Co, IL
    Buried: Union Cem., Macon Co., IL
    Parents: Isaiah & Sarah J. (Strope) Querry
    Married: 3 Aug 1886 in Macon Co, IL to Frank Mathias
    Children:




  MATTES, Mrs. John

The funeral of Mrs. John Mattes will take place this afternoon from the First Methodist church, at half past one o’clock. The services will be conducted by Rev. M. Raeder, of the German Methodist church.

Daily Review, Decatur, IL, 8 Apr 1886

The funeral of Mrs. John Mattes took place yesterday from the First Methodist church. Rev. Raeder conducted the services. Music was furnished by a choir composed of John Sleeter, Albert Witzeman and Mrsses Witzeman and Meidermeyer. The pall bearers were William and Charles Sleeter, J.C. and Henry Ammann, and G.M. and J.G. Auer.

Daily Review, Decatur, IL, 9 Apr 1886





  MATTHEWS, John
Wabash Veteran - Dies at 58

John Matthews, 58, 1722 North Edward Street, a Wabash employee for 20 years, died Wednesday at 5 p.m. at Wabash Employees Hospital. Besides his widow, he leaves a son, J. Harold Matthews of Granite City and four daughters, Mrs Charles Young, Macon, Mrs. Anna Schultz, Decatur; Miss Mary Matthews, Macon; Mrs Frank Wagner, Defiance, Ohio.

Mr Matthews was born in Macon and lived there until coming to Decatur in 1922. He was a member of St. Thomas church, Decatur Council No. 577 Knights of Columbus, Holy Name Society and Brotherhood of American Railway employees.

The body was taken to Moran & Sons funeral home. Friends may call at the residence today after 7 p.m. Requiem high mass will be celebrated at St. Thomas Church Thursday at 9 a.m. Burial arrangements are incomplete.

Decatur Review, 26 Nov 1942, pg. 3





  MAUZY, John

John Mauzy, former sheriff of Macon county, died at 4:30 o'clock Wednesday afternoon in his home near Oakland, Ill. Mr. Mauzy was seventy-eight years old. He was sheriff of Macon couty in the later eighties, moving to his farm near Oakland about twenty-five years ago, where he has resided ever since. He is survived by one son, Joe Mauzy of Oakland, and two grand-sons. The funeral is in progress at Oakland this afternoon.

Decatur Review, 2 May 1919

According to the Illinois State Death Index, John's wife Harriett E. Mauzy died on 6 Dec 1928 at Oakland, Coles Co., IL.





  MAUZY, Joseph C.

JOE MAUZY, ONCE TRIED FOR MURDER HERE, DIES

Figured in Celebrated Case in Which Jack Faunce Was Convicted, Sentenced, Then Pardoned

Joseph C. Mauzy, son of John Mauzy, former sheriff of Macon county, died Friday at his home in Oakland, Ill. He was fifty-two years old. His death was caused by tuberculosis, with which he had suffered for a long time.

He is survived by his wife, from whom he was separated, one son Connie Mauzy, and two grand-children.

IN FAMOUS TRIAL

Old residents will remember Joe Mauzy, who was defendant in the most remarkable trial ever held in Macon county. Matt McKinley, a popular man, was shot and killed on the night of July 3, 1889, when he went to the rescue of two women who called for help when a man was abusing them.

JACK FAUNCE ARRESTED

Jack Faunce was arrested for that murder. Thomas Lee, an uncle of Attorney J.C. Lee, had been engaged to defend Faunce, but Mr. Lee died just before the case came up for trial and the court appointed Joe Burres and Fred Brown, two young lawyers who had just been admitted to the bar, to defend Faunce.

SHERIFF'S PISTOL FOUND

John Mauzy was sheriff at that time, and a revolver, said to be the property of the Sheriff, was found in the alley after the murder. Faunce maintained his innocence, but luck was against him. He had been at the Oakland part theater. The company went broke and that night Faunce accompanied the members into the city. They could have proved an alibi for him, but they could not afford to stay here and they scattered and could not be located at the time of the trial.

Faunce was convicted to life imprisonment in the penitentiary. Nine out of every ten people in Macon county believed Faunce was innocent. Three of Decatur's leading lawyers made unsuccessful attempts to get a pardon for him.

REPORTER INVESTIGATES

He had served nine ears when a Review reporter started to trail down statements alleged to have been made by eye-witnesses to the effect that instead of Jack Faunce it was Joe Mauzy who committed that murder.

The Review man hunted up the witnesses and secured affidavits from them, sworn to before senator O.W. Smith, who at that time was a justice of the peace in Decatur. The Review man went before the board of pardons in behalf of Faunce and presented those affidavits, backed up by a petition from thousands of Macon county citizens asking that Faunce be released.

MAUZY INDICTED

The affidavits were published in The Review, and the result was that the grand jury, then in session, returned an indictment against Joe Mauzy, charging him with the murder of Matt McKinley. It was the first time in the history of the county that a man had been indicted for a murder committed so long ago, and the first time a man had been indicted for a crime that another man was already serving a life sentence for. Mauzy was acquitted after a sensational trial, but the evicence left no doubt in the minds of the people that some other than Jack Faunce committed that murder.

PARDON GRANTED

The petition for a pardon was granted after he had served nine years and had almost given up hope. He is still alive and is living in Kansas City, Mo., but nearly all the members of the jury that convicted him and the grand juty that indicted him, the attorney who prosecuted him and the judge who sentenced him, are dead.

Decatur Review, 17 Nov 1922





  MAXWELL, Margaret E. (Bunn)

Mrs. Alfred Maxwell died of la grippe Saturday afternoon at the familiy residence, No. 207 West William street, aged about 57 years. The deceased ws a native of Ross county, Ohio, and came to Decatur in 1854. She was a daughter of the late Rev. D.P. Bunn, and was known to all of the older residents of the city. She was married on December 12, 1860, to Alfred Maxwell, and has always resided in Decatur, except a few years spent in Taylorville. Mrs. Maxwell was a sister to D.L. Bunn, of this city, and Mrs. M.E. Rockwell, of Taylorville, who with her husband survive her. Mrs. Maxwell was an excellent woman in every way. She had a rare quality in every way. She had a rare quality of courage. Disappointment and sorrows came, but she did not succumb to them. She entered upon married life with every promise of comfort and happiness. Financial misfortune followed but she found joy and consolation in her children. They grew almost to manhood and womanhood and then sickened and died. To many a woman who made sacrifices through the long years for the sake of these children, this would have been a calamity from which she could never recover. But Mrs. Maxwell was a woman who could rise above despair. She might suffer, but her heart would not break; she might be cast down but she would not despair. Taking up her burden of life again, she proved that it was infinitely more noble and more beautiful to strive for those remaining than to give up and surrender. And so through long years again her life was one of patient self-sacrifice. There was no variance, no shadow of turning, no surrender until the last summons came. The world has known many a greater woman perhaps, but none truer to her duties in life. She was chastened by sorrow, and she was ever kind, gentle and considerate to friends. She won the love and admiration of many, and her death will be mourned by a large circle. Her life was one of self-sacrifice and devotion, her reward the crown received for the pure and spotless life.

Herald Despatch (Decatur), 4 Apr 1891





  MAY, Ida (Moffett)

DEATH OF MRS. HENRY F. MAY

The death of Mrs. Henry F. May took place at the residence of her father, David C. Moffett, five miles west of the city, this forenoon at about 11 o'clock.

Her death will occasion little surprise to the publice, as she had been ill for nearly three years, and had been confined to her bed since last January, in such a low state of health that her demise was daily expected by her family and friends.

The deceased, whose maiden name was Ida Moffett, was a member of the First M.E. church; she was a graduate of the Decatur High School, and taught for several years in the third ward school building. In September of last year she was taken overland to Colorado by her husband, in the hope that the trip and a brief sojourn in that favorable climate would in time restore her health. For a while she gained strength and seemed to improve; but it was not permanent, and she returned to Decatur and her father's home last January, where she died to-day, as above stated.

All that a loving husband and kind relatives and friends could do for her, or the most skillful physician could suggest, was of no avail, and the loved wife and daughter has passed over the dark river of the better world which knows no pain, no sickness or sorrow.

She leaves a bereaved husband, and a child 18 months old.

The time of the funeral will be duly announced in these columns.

Decatur Daily Republican, 14 May 1879

REQUIESCAT IN PACE

Funeral of Mrs. Ida Moffitt May - Text of the Sermon by Dr. Goodwin.

From Saturday's Daily

On yesterday afternoon at two o'clock the large auditorium of the First M.E. Church was well filled with our best people, who wished to pay their last tribute of respect to a lady well known and highly regarded in the various circles of the city. The deceased was a graduate of the Decatur high school, and for a number of years was a teacher in the third ward school. A large majority of the persons present yesterday were ladies, as the hour was such as prevented the business men of the city from attending. The floral decorations were unusually tasteful and appropriate, and were prepared by Miss Emma Gray, Miss Shaffer, Miss Nale, Mrs. Laura Brett, Mrs. L.L. Haworth and Mrs. C. Conklin. Excellent singing was furnished by H.L. Montgomery, Benton Blackstone, Mrs. Ida Armstrong and Miss Sallie Roe. Prof. Albert Condell presided at the organ in the absence of Mr. G.F. Wessels, and the organ was handled in his usual masterly manner.

"WHY SHOULD GOOD PEOPLE DIE?"

The pastor of the deceased lady, Rev. Dr. Goodwin, conducted the services, and Father Crissey, a particular friend of Mrs. May, offered a peculiarly appropriate prayer at the close. The sermon was about 30 minutes in length, and was listened to with the closest attention, and it seemed to make a deep impression upon the large congregation. We have room only for the text and a mere ouline of the sermon. The text was the 4th verse of the 23d Psalm, and after the beautiful figures used in the text had been explained, the speaker first answered the question, "Why should good people die?" The answers given were that God's justice and impartiality demand this. The punishment, or result of sin, was to be death, and as all have sinned all must die; and the death of the good shows God's love for his children. The rewards of grace cannot be enjoyed here, for while in the flesh we cannot contain all that God intends we shall enjoy. We must die to obtain the full reward God intends to give his people. The speaker next noticed the reasons the christian has for fearing no evil in the dying hour. These are the presence of the Savior, the safety and comfort offered by his rod and staff. Only to those who love Jesus is such safety or comfort promised. Reference was made to the faith and the dying trust of the deceased, who was fully prepared for her departure.

The above is a very meager outline of the discourse. After the friends had taken a last look at the face of the dead, the long procession moved to the cemetery, where the burial service was read, and the loved form of Ida Moffitt May was laid away to rest till the resurrection morn.

The pallbearers were Geo. S. Durfee, I.W. Ehrman, O.B. Gorin, W.C. Armstrong, T.J. Abel and Cy. M. Imboden.

The bereaved husband and stricken parents and family have the sincere sympathy of many people.

Decatur Weekly Republican, 22 May 1879





  MAY, Lois Ellen (Cowgill)
    Born: 27 Feb 1920 in Decatur Macon Co, IL
    Died: 21 Jun 1986 in El Monte, CA
    Buried: Los Angeles National Cem, Los Angeles, CA
    Parents: Ralph Orestes & Faye Inez (Reed) Cowgill
    Married: 24 Dec 1937 to William John Georgi
    Married: 23 Jul 1952 to Charles Richard Britton
    Married: Nov 1964 in Las Vegas, NV to Carl May
    Children: 1st marriage Max, William




  MAY, Sally Valentine (Fitzpatrick)

Funeral services for Sally V. May, 83 of 1665 East Marietta street, who died at 12:30 P.M. Monday in the Decatur & Macon County hospital following a four weeks' illness, will be conducted at P.M. Wednesday in the Third United Brethren church. Burial will be in Fairlawn cemetery. Friends may call at Monson funeral home.

She was born in Versailles county Kentucky, Jan 7, 1854, and married James F.W. Boone, who died Jan 15, 1920. She later married Edwin May, who died March 23, 1933. She has been a resident of Decatur for the last 71 years and a member of the Third United Brethren church.

She leaves two sons, Frank Boone of Green Switch and Charles R. Boone of Decatur, two sisters, Mrs. Mary Gallagher, Chicago and Mrs. Lizzie S. Skelley of Decatur, and a brother Richard F. Fitzpatrick of Decatur.

Decatur Review, 26 Oct 1937, pg. 17



  MAYALL, Miles   

The funeral of Miles Mayall was held at 10 o’clock Sunday morning at the church of God and was largely attended. The service was conducted by Rev. I.S. Richmond pastor of the church. Music was furnished by a male quarter. The floral offerings were many and beautiful.

Five grandsons and one great grandson of Mr. Mayall were pallbearers. They were Walter Morthland of Springfield, Miles Morthland of Austin Township, Roy Morthland of Austin township, Raymond Kerwood of Warrensburg., Lee Morthland of Hickory Point Township, all grandsons and Henry Holderness of Hickory Point township, grea grand son. Interment was at Illini cemetery.

The death of Mr. Mayall occurred Thursday night at 11:20. He suffered a paralytic stroke on Monday afternoon and never recovered. He had been able to be around up to that time though his health was not of the best. He was a member of the Church of God.

Mr. Mayall would have been seventy years old in January. He was a veteran of two wars, the Civil and Mexican wars. He went through 108 battles and was never injured. In January of this year he was given a postcard shower on his birthday and received about 100 cards, many of them containing the stars and stripes.

Mr. Mayall was born and reared in Philadelphia. From there the family went to Perry county Pa., where they lived several years. They came to Illinois in 1871 and settled in Decatur. After living here three years they went to Warrensburg which has been the home of Mr. Mayall since.

He was married in 1851 to Margaret McClintock. To this union were born nine children, only three of whom survive. They are Mrs. C. J. Johnson of Decatur, Mrs. Ben Kerwood Of Warrensburg and Mrs. Jon Criswell of Warrensburg. He also leaves fourteen grandchildren and fifteen great grandchildren.

The Daily Review, Decatur IL, 7 Nov 1910, pg. 11



  MAYBERRY, David L.   

David L. Mayberry of Decatur, veteran of the civil war, died Thursday afternoon in the Soldier’s home at Quincy. He was eighty-two years old and had been an invalid for a long time. He is survived by his wife and the following children: Benjamin Mayberry and Mrs. H. M. Ross of Decatur, Elmer Mayberry of ???, and Frank Mayberry, who is now in Indiana.

The body was brought to Decatur Saturday forenoon and taken to the Moran & Sons chapel, where funeral services will be held Sunday afternoon.

Decatur Daily Review, Decatur IL, 23 Sep 1922





  MAYS, William H.

William H. Mays died at 1 o'clock Sunday afternoon at the family residence, 289 East Marietta street. He would have been 60 years old this month. Mr. Mays was one of the best known men in Decatur. He was a member of the Decatur police department under Mayor C.M. Borchers, working as health officer and also as a plain clothes man. He also worked for the city in various other departments for a number of years. He had been in poor health for a long time, and a year ago he suffered a stroke of paralysis. The immediate cause of death was uraemic poisoning.

Mr. Mays was born near Maysville, Ken. August 16, 1855. His parents moved to Macon county and settled at Mt. Zion when he was only one year old. Ten years later he moved to Macon and made that his home for many years. He and Miss Stella Biddle were married at Macon April 18, 1888. The family moved to Decatur seventeen years ago and has been there ever since. Besides his wife he is survived by two children, Mrs. Dorothy Weikel of Springfield and Miss Eva Mays of Decatur.

Daily Review (Decatur), 2 August 1915


The funeral of William H. Mays will be held at 2 o'clock Tuesday afternoon at the family residence 289 Marietta street. The interment will be in Macon cemetery. If the roads are good, the funeral party will make the trip in automobiles. Otherwise they will go on the Illinois Central.

Daily Review (Decatur), 2 August 1915





  McCARTY, Cornelius

Cornelius McCarty, aged eighty years, died yesterday afternoon about half past three o'clock, of a complication of diseases. The deceased leaves a widow and five children. The funeral will be announced later.

The Daily Review, Decatur, IL, 30 Apr 1886





  McCARTY, Mary

DIES SUDDENLY ON VISIT TO DAUGHTER

Mrs. Mary McCarty's Home Was in Sterling

Mrs. Mary McCarty died suddenly Sunday night at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Elizabeth Coakley, 268 South Broadway. Her home was in Sterling, Ills. She came here three weeks ago on a visit. She was taken ill two or three days ago. Her age was seventy-three years.

She had lived at Sterling for ten or twelve years and before that made her home at Champaign and Ivesdale. She is survived by six children, Mrs. Margaret Farris of Missouri, Mrs. Elizabeth Coakley of Decatur, Michael McCarty of Chicago, John McCarty, Mrs. Agnes Kanzler and Joseph McCarty, all of Sterling, Ill. The body will be taken to Sterling at 10:45 Tuesday morning. The funeral will be held there Wednesday.

The Daily Review (Decatur), 10 May 1909



  McCAY, Samuel C.   

Samuel C. McKay, a veteran of the Civil war and a former resident of Cerro Gordo, died at 7:45 o’clock Thursday night at this home, 745 West Waggoner street. He was eighty-four years old last October. His death followed his third stroke of apoplexy.

Mr. McKay was born in West Alexander, Pa., Oct. 10, 1841. He came to Illinois many years ago, and when the Civil war broke out he enlisted in the Seventh Illinois Volunteer Cavalry. He was made a corporal and served from Sept. 3, 1861, till Sept. 12, 1864.

At the close of the war Mr. McKay returned to Illinois and settled on a farm near Cerro Gordo, farming for many years. He moved into Cerro Gordo on his retirement from active farm life and lived there eighteen years, moving from there to Decatur in 1918. He was steward of the Presbyterian church in Cerro Gordo, and the G.A.R. post and the I.O.O.F. lodge in Cerro Gordo. He is survived by his wife and one sister, Miss May McKay of Hale, Mo.

The body was removed to the L. A. Monson undertaking establishment and prepared for burial.

Decatur Review, Decatur IL, 25 Dec 1925, pg 3





  McCLELLAN, Lucinda (Wiggins)

The last sad rites over the remains of the late Mrs. Henry McClellan, took place yesterday afternoon at three o’clock from the family residence on South Main street. The services were very largely attended by friends and relatives of the deceased. The members of the city council, city officers, board of supervisors and the Knights Pythias, attended in bodies. Rev. Dr. Vosburgh of the Baptist church conducted the services. He preached a sermon from the text "I am the resurrection and the life." Dr. Vosburgh stood in the front door way, the residence and yard both being filled with people. The choir of the Baptist church was present and rendered several beautiful selections. The casket was covered with floral offerings among which were two large pillows, an anchor, a cross, star and other beautiful designs. They came from the alderman, county officers and friends. The pall bearers were Messrs. H.W. Waggoner, W.H. Shorb, A.T. Grist, W.P. Shade, F.W. Wismer and I.D. Walker. The remains of the deceased were interred in Greenwood cemetery.

The Daily Review, Decatur, IL, 11 Mar 1886

(NOTE: Lucinda Wiggins McClellan's first husband was Nicholas Schwagter on 29 Nov 1856.)





  McCLUSKEY, Charles Wilbur

C.W. M'CLUSKEY HIGHLY ESTEEMED

Dies in Home After Illness Lasting Since January

Charles Wilbur McCluskey died at _:30 o'clock Tuesday afternoon in the family residence, 155 West North street. He was forty-four years old last January. His death was caused by a complication of diseases, with which he had suffered greatly since last January.

Mr. McCluskey was highly esteemed by his neighbors and associates, and those who knew him longest and best held him in highest regard. In his business relations he was always straight and honorable. He was cheerful and companionable and during his long suffering he did not complain. He was devoted to his home and family and his home had more attraction for him than any other place.

MOVED HERE IN 1905

Mr. McCluskey was born near Owaneco, Ill., Jan 22, 1875. When he was ten years old he moved with his parents to Blue Mound, where he lived until 1905, when he moved to Decatur and has lived here ever since. For a number of years he was associated with Byrd L. Davis, managing the office of the Davis Livery company. He was widely known as an even-tempered, courteous man. Mr. McCluskey was twice married. His first wife was Miss Mae Bowman of Moweaqua. Her death occurred in 1903. One son was born to them. Phloyd McCluskey, now of San Antonio, Tex. Mr. McCluskey and Miss Hattie Belle Goodale of Blue Mound were married Jan. 21, 1905. Beside his wife and son, he is survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. H.L. McCluskey, and two brothers, Calvin and Francis McCluskey, and one sister, Mrs. Ona Hedges, all of San Antonio, Tex. Mrs. McCluskey was a member of the Loyal American lodge of Decatur.

The funeral will be held at 4 o'clock Thursday afternoon in the family residence, 155 West North street.

Decatur Review, 27 Aug 1919





  McCLUSKEY, Mae (Bowman)

Dr. Thomas Bowman of Chicago came Monday, being called here by the death of his sister, Mrs. Mae Bowman-McCluskey, who died at Blue Mound Sunday. Her remains will be brought here for burial Tuesday. Funeral services at the M.E. church at 11 o'clock by Rev. W.F. Stephenson.

The Daily Review (Decatur), 12 May 1903





  McCLUSKEY, Mary Marilla

Miss Mary Marilla McCluskey died at 10:20 o'clock Thursday morning at her home, 642 West Macon street. She would have been sixty-two years old in February. Miss McCluskey had been in failing health for some time, but her illness did not appear to be serious until a few hours before her death.

Miss McCluskey was born in Dyesville, O., Feb. 12, 1864. With her parents she came to Illinois in 1866. All of her life since then has been spent in Moweaqua and Decatur. Her nearest relatives are two brothers, David McCluskey of Blue Mound and Peter McCluskey of Decatur. The body was removed to Monson undertaking establishment and prepared for burial.

Decatur Review, 31 Dec 1925





  McCLUSKEY, Olga

Mrs. F.C. Frees has received word of the death of her sister, Mrs. Olga McCluskey in Los Angeles, Cal., which occurred Wednesday morning. She formerly lived in Decatur, having left here about ten years ago.

Mrs. McCluskey is survived by her husband, Tom McCluskey, her sister, Mrs. F.C. Frees, her mother, Mrs. Fred Wessollek, 1030 East Condit street, Decatur, three daughters, Mrs. Shlinkert, Nellie and Carrie mcCluskey, and a brother, August, of Lancaster, Pa., and another brother, Herman of Delleville.

Decatur Review, 25 Sep 1925





  McCLUSKEY, Peter

PETER M'CLUSKEY DIES SUDDENLY

Emloye of Linn and Scruggs Suffers Stroke

Peter B. McCluskey of 462 West Macon street, for several years employed at the Linn & Scruggs store died at 6:15 o'clock Tuesday morning at St. Mary's hospital. He would have been seventy-six years old in July. His death was caused by a stroke of apoplexy. He was stricken while on the street down town about 5 o'clock Monday afternoon and was taken to the hospital at once. It was his third stroke.

Peter B. McCluskey was born in Guernsey county, O., July 26, 1850. He came to Illinois in 1866. For the last twenty-five years he had made his home in Decatur. He was well known and well liked. He is survived by one brother, David McCluskey of Blue Mound. The body was removed to the Monson undertaking establishment and prepared for burial.

The funeral will be held at 2:30 o'clock Wednesday afternoon at the Monson chapel. The burial will be in the Moweaqua cemetery.

Decatur Review, 8 Jun 1926





  McCOID, Mrs. W.T.

Mrs. W.T. McCoid died at 10:20 o'clock Wednesday morning at the family residence, 512 East King street. She would have been fifty-one years old in June. Her death was caused by heart trouble afetr an illness of about four weeks.

Mrs. McCoid was born in Zanesville, O., but had lived in Clinton most of her life. For the last nine years the family has lived in Decatur. She was a member of the Baptist church in Clinton. She is survived by her husband and two daughters, Mrs. Ralph Moore and Mrs. George Welty, both of Decatur. She also leaves her mother, Mrs. Amy Reid, and a sister, Mrs. Henry Hamblen, both of Clinton. The body was removed to the Monson & Wilcox undertaking establishment and prepared for burial.

The Decatur Review, Decatur, IL, 3 May 1922





  McCONNELL, William

DIED - In Whitmore township on October 12, at 12:40 a.m., of consumption, Wm. McConnell, aged 28 years. The deceased was single and a farmer, son of Mrs. Sarah McConnell, a widow.

Saturday Herald, Decatur, IL, Saturday, 16 Oct 1886



  McCORMICK, James   

James McCormick was found dead in a work shop Saturday on the farm of Jesse DeLong, fourteen miles northeast of Decatur and about four miles from Oreana. McCormick was an old soldier and was well known in Decatur where he spent much of his time. He had been an inmate of the poor farm for some time, but recently took a trip around through the county and a few days ago visited the home of Mr. DeLong, with whom he was acquainted. He was at that place all day Friday and sat around the yard in the shade. He took his meals there and seemed in his usual health. He had his pension papers with him and as usual when he went there, he gave them to Mrs. DeLong to keep for him lest he should lose them. He drew his pension money on July 4, $36, but he had no money on his person when found. Mr. DeLong went to the workshop early yesterday to call McCormick and found him dead. The body was still warm.

McCormick has no relatives living and little is known about him. The body will be buried today at the cemetery near where he died. Coroner Bendure was notified and went to the farm and held the inquest.

The Daily Review, Decatur IL, 18 Jul 1897





  McCORMICK, Julia (Joubert)

Mrs. McCormick Called By Death

Funeral Services to Be Held Saturday

Mrs. Julia McCormick, wife of Charles J. McCormick, died at 7:40 o'clock Thursday night at St. Mary's hospital. She was fifty-four years old last February. Her death was caused by pneumonia and complications after an illness of one week.

Mrs. McCormick's maiden name was Julia Joubert. She was born in Oraville, Ill., Feb. 6, 1875, and she and Charles J. McCormick were married there April 20, 1892. The home was in Springfield before they moved to Decatur in 1901. She was a member of the First Baptist Church, Decatur chapter No. 111, O. E. S., the Royal Neighbors and the American Legion auxiliary.

She was a great lover of flowers and raised many fine specimens at her home. She had more than 100 kinds of flowers in her garden, mostly gladiolus. She was well known in the community.

She is survived by her husband and the following children: Mrs. Ethel Coard, Armarilla, Tex., Mrs. Stella Landholt and Charles P. McCormick of Decatur, and Mrs. Inez Carpenter of Ironwood, Mich. She also leaves two sisters, Mrs. Leonore Buckley of Whatcheer, Ia., and Mrs. Vittiline Costin of Omaha, Neb. There are six grandchildren. The body was taken to Dawson & Wikoff, funeral directors, and prepared for burial.

The funeral will be held at 2 o'clock Saturday afternoon at the Dawson & Wikoff chapel. The burial will be in Fairlawn Cemetery.

The Decatur Review, Friday, November 1, 1929





  McCOY, George Edward
    Born: 29 Mar 1875 in Long Creek Twp, Macon County, IL
    Died: 21 Jun 1955 in Mount Zion, Macon County, IL
    Buried: Point Pleasant Cemetery, Long Creek Twp, Macon County, IL
    Parents: John W. McCoy and Lucinda Maddox
    Married: Mary Etta Davis on 27 Jan 1898 Macon County, IL
    Married: Thelma Irene Warner on 25 Oct 1943 Decatur, Macon County, IL
    Children: Caroline, Doty Lulu, Gladys Juanita, Mina Florence, Emma Viola, Dale, Wayne Robert, William Russell, Lloyd Lawrence, Harold Edward, three sons preceded him in death.




  McCOY, John Thomas
    Born: 9 Apr 1883 in Mount Zion, Macon County, IL
    Died: 13 Jun 1923 in Friends Creek, IL
    Buried: Point Pleasant Cemetery, Long Creek Twp., Macon County, IL
    Parents: John W. McCoy and Lucinda Maddox
    Married: Myrtle Turpin on 21 Sep 1904 in Decatur, Macon County, IL
    Children: Clifford, Iva May, Hubert Lloyd, Clara Maxine, Kenneth Robert, Berlin Glenn, Dottie Berneece, Mildred Nadine, Edith Fay, Troy Eugene.




  McCOY, Mary Etta
    Born: 12 Oct 1881 in IL
    Died: 1 Jan 1925 in Mount Zion, Macon County, IL
    Buried: Point Pleasant Cemetery, Long Creek Twp. Macon County, IL
    Parents: Thomas Davis and Dota Crails
    Married: George Edward McCoy on 27 Jan 1898 in Macon County, IL
    Children: Caroline, Doty Lula, Gladys Juanita, Mina Florence, Emma Viola, Dale, Wayne Robert, William Russell, Lloyd Lawrence, Harold Edward, three sons preceded her in death.




  McCOY, Myrtle
    Born: 8 May 1886 in Mount Zion, Macon County, IL
    Died: 30 Jan 1955 in Mount Zion, Macon County, IL
    Buried: Point Pleasant Cemetery, Long Creek Twp. Macon County, IL
    Parents: Robert Thomas Turpin and Nancy I. Reed
    Married: John Thomas McCoy on 21 Sep 1904 in Decatur, Macon County, IL
    Children: Clifford, Iva May, Hubert Lloyd, Clara Maxine, Kenneth Robert, Berlin Glenn, Dottie Berneece, Mildred Nadine, Edith Fay, Troy Eugene.




  McCOY, Thelma Irene
    Born: about 1915
    Died. 10 Jul 1990 at age 75 in Decatur, Macon County, IL
    Buried: Macon County Memorial Park, Harristown, IL
    Married: George Edward Maddox on 25 Oct 1943 in Decatur, Macon County, IL
    Parents:
    Children: Gerald Warner, Dale McCoy, and Caroline Black only children listed in obituary




  McCOY, Harold Edward
    Born: 28 Apr 1924 in Mount Zion, Macon County, IL.
    Died: 02 Sep 1994 in Decatur, Macon County, IL.
    Buried: Point Pleasant Cemetery, Long Creek Twp. Macon County, IL.
    Parents: George Edward McCoy and Mary Etta Davis
    Married: Doris Heinz
    Married: Anna Faye Larimore
    Children: four surviving children




  McCOY, Ira O.
    Born: 12 Mar 1877 in Long Creek, Macon County, IL
    Died: 11 Jun 1951 in Mount Zion, Macon County, IL
    Buried: Point Pleasant Cemetery, Long Creek Twp. Macon County, IL
    Parents: John W. McCOY and Lucinda F. Maddox
    Married: never




  McCOY, James
    Born: about 1887 in IL.
    Died: 11 Feb 1911 in Mount Zion, Macon County, IL
    Buried: Point Pleasant Cemetery, Long Creek Twp, Macon County, IL
    Parents: John W. McCOY and Lucinda F. Maddox
    Married: never




  McCOY, Lucinda F.
    Born: 12 Jun 1847 in Harrisburg, KY
    Died: 28 Jan 1935 in Mount Zion, Macon County, IL
    Buried: Point Pleasant Cemetery, Long Creek Twp. Macon County, IL
    Parents: Edward Maddox and Rhoda Montgomery
    Married: John W. McCOY on 3 Jan 1872 in Washington County, IN.
    Children: George Edward, Ira O., Rhoda Idella, Lucinda "Lucy", John Thomas, James.




  McCOY, Wayne Robert "Shorty"
    Born: 14 May 1907 in Mount Zion, Macon County, IL
    Died: 21 Jan 1972 in Decatur, Macon County, IL
    Buried: Point Pleasant Cemetery, Long Creek Twp. Macon County, IL
    Parents: George Edward McCoy and Mary Etta Davis
    Married: Bernice Viola Burns in 1931
    Children: Robert, Donald, Benny, Richard, Dean, Delores, Sharon




  McCOY, William Russell "Russ"
    Born: 16 May 1909 in Macon County, IL
    Died: 26 Mar 1985 in Decatur, Macon County, IL
    Buried: Graceland Cemetery, Decatur, Macon County, IL
    Parents: George Edward McCoy and Mary Etta Davis
    Married: Gladys Marie Inman on 13 May 1930 in Decatur, Macon County, IL
    Married: Pauline Rose Lewellen, Kathryn Bernice Ross, Joann ?
    Children: George and Larry McCoy, Jeff and Larry Jenkins, Catherine McCoy and Dolly Bobbitt




  McCOY, Lloyd L.
    Born: about 1920 in Elwin, IL
    Died: 06 Nov 1986 at age 66 Decatur, Macon County, IL
    Buried: body donated to science
    Parents: George Edward McCoy and Mary Etta Davis
    Married: Irene L. Beauchamp on 17 Jan 1945
    Children: none listed in Obituary




  McCOY, Clifford Ewing
    Born: 18 May 1905 near Dalton City, IL
    Died: 05 Jan 1971 in Decatur, Macon County, IL
    Buried: Point Pleasant Cemetery, Long Creek Twp, Macon County, IL
    Parents: John Thomas McCoy and Myrtle Turpin
    Married: Hazel C. Benton on 30 Nov 1935 in Shodonier, IL
    Children: Mrs. Sam (Barbara) Fonner




  McCOY, Hubert Lloyd "Dubes"
    Born: 20 Nov 1909 in Macon County, IL
    Died: 9 Jan 1988 in Decatur, Macon County, IL
    Buried: Point Pleasant Cemetery, Long Creek Twp. Macon County, IL
    Parents: John Thomas McCoy and Myrtle Turpin
    Married: Wanetta Pearl Duncan on 8 Jun 1932
    Children: Kenneth, Norman "Buck", Imogene Wendel, Irene Samples, Ilene Bergman




  McCOY, Berlin Glenn
    Born: 17 Jan 1915 Argenta, IL
    Died: 16 Aug 1993 in Decatur, Macon County, IL
    Buried: Point Pleasant Cemetery, Long Creek Twp. Macon County, IL
    Parents: John Thomas McCoy and Myrtle Turpin
    Married: Opal Robinson on 8 May 1937
    Children: none listed in obituary




  McCOY, George W.
    Born: 6 Nov 1848
    Died: 19 Dec 1926
    Buried:
    Parents:
    Married:
    Children:




  McCOY, John Thomas
    Born: 9 Apr 1883
    Died: 13 Jun 1923
    Buried:
    Parents:
    Married:
    Children:




  McCOY, Mary Etta
    Born: 12 Oct 1881
    Died: 1 Jan 1, 1925
    Buried:
    Parents:
    Married:
    Children:




  McCRACKEN, James

OLD RESIDENT OF WARRENSBURG DIES

J.M. McCracken was 71 Years of Age; Long in Town

Warrensburg, Jan 31 - J.M. McCracken died Saturday afternoon at 3 o'clock with complications of diseases. He was 71 years old and was an old resident of the town. He leaves a widow and three children, a daughter in the west, a daughter Eula who is a trained nurse in Chicago and a son, Charles, in Warrensburg. The funeral will be Tuesday morning at 11 o'clock from the Congregational church.

The Daily Review (Decatur), 31 Jan 1910





  McCURRY, Lester J.

News of the death of Lester J. McCurry at Clinton, Ia. Sunday night was received in Decatur Monday. Mr. McCurry was employed by the Decatur Home Telephone company about three years ago, later moving to Clinton, Ia. His wife was formerly Miss Bertha Moore of Decatur, and the message stated that she is in the hospital there.

Decatur Review, 17 December 1918





  McDANIEL, Glenn J.
    Born: 29 Apr 1899 in Decatur, Macon Co, IL
    Died: 12 Aug 1949
    Buried:
    Parents: George W. & Mary (Houck) McDaniel
    Married: 08 Nov 1920 in Decatur, Macon Co, Il to Vera Gladys Reed
    Children: William, Marilyn


  McDONALD, John   
John McDonald, aged 58 years, died yesterday at 1128 East Marietta street. The deceased, who was a veteran of a Massachusetts regiment, had been in the employ of the Wabash, and had contracted a severe case of the grip. He was a charge at the Springfield hospital, and came back. He was violently insane for awhile. He leaves a widow and four children. The funeral will take place tomorrow afternoon at 2 o’clock from the Catholic church.

Decatur Daily Republican, 26 Mar 1890, pg. 3





  McDONALD, R.F.

R.F. McDonald, one of the foremost men of Long Creek township, despondent because of ill health, committed suicide in his home near Casner Monday morning, by shooting with a revolver.

R.F. McDonald was a man of splendid physique, in his prime endowed with great energy and the strength to do his will and a life of invalidism was so foreign to all that he had personally known during his busy life that it was to him abhorent.

R.F. McDonald was born in Winchester, Scott county, May 27, 1854, but had been a resident of Long Creek practically all of his life, his parents moving to that locality when he was an infant. In all affairs where the men who stand for what is best are to be found, R.F. McDonald was ever certain to be listed eager to do his part. A staunch party man, he had ever been a Republican active in the affairs of his party, and had more that once been called to serve the community in township service.

He was a member of Casner lodge 463, I.O.O.F. The surviving members of his family are his wife and three daughters, Mrs. Lulu Quickel, Decatur; Mrs. Bessie Lindsey, Forsyth, and Mrs. Gladys Risley, Philadelphia. Also he leaves two sisters, Mrs. Florence Prather, Mrs. Alice Baird, and two brothers, John and George McDonald all of Decatur. Funeral services will be conducted in Casner church Wednesday morning at 10:30 o'clock. The burial will be in Long Creek cemetery.

Unknown newspaper, Feb 28, 1921



  McGAFFEY, J.D.   

J.D. McGaffey, the well known traveling salesman, started for a walk early yesterday morning. Just before noon he was brought back on the street car by Nelson Hagerman and two other men. They had found him at the end of the walk at the extreme end of the East Wood street. He was lying on the ground and was then almost helpless. He just had strength enough to tell them to take him to his home at Hotel Brunswick. There he was attended by three physicians, Dr. O.R. Allen, the family physician, Dr. J.S. King and Dr. Will Barnes. They did all that was possible, but he was beyond earthly help and died at 4:35 in the afternoon.

The doctors state that death was caused by apoplexy and congestion of the stomach. It was reported that Mr. McGaffey had taken an overdose of morphine. This, it is stated, could not be possible, because the symptoms indicated that was not the. case. Mr. McGaffey has been in poor health for some time, though he was able to get around until the illness of yesterday morning. He was attending to business until a short time ago.

Mr. McGaffey was born in Linden, Vt., fifty years ago. He came to Decatur about fifteen years ago. Nearly all of that time he has been at the Hotel Brunswick. When he came here he was a traveling salesman for a wholesale house. About five years afterwards he went on the road for the Longman & Martinez Paint company and has been with them ever since. He traveled over Illinois and several western states.

Mr. McGaffey was a Mason and was a Knight Templar. He was a soldier in the war of Rebellion. He had so far as known $1,000 insurance on his life. Some years ago he had $10,000, but let half of it lapse purposely. Three months ago $5,000 expired. This he intended to renew, but it is believed he had not done so. Besides the widow, Mr. McGaffey leaves only a sister, who resides in Vermont.

The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon and will be in charge of Beaumanoir commandery, No. 9, K.T.

The Daily Review, Decatur IL, 6 Dec 1892, pg. 3





  McGEEHON, Lucy (Chambers)

The body of Mrs. Lucy Chambers McGeehon arrived Thursday morning form Atlantic, Ia., and was taken to Cerro Gordo where funeral services will be held on Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock in the Brethren church. Burial will be in the Peck cemetery.

Decatur Evening Herald, 29 May 1928





  McGLADE, John

John McGlade, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. John McGlade, of cholera infantum, Friday, Sept. 3, at the family residence on South Colfax street, aged 1 month and 2 days.

Decatur Daily Republican, Decatur, IL, 9 Sep 1893



  McGLENNEN, Charles E.   

C.E. McGlennen of 2205 North Union street died at 7:30 o’clock Tuesday morning at the Decatur and Macon County hospital. He was eighty-three years old last November. His death was caused by pneumonia after an illness of only four days.

Mr. McGlennen was born in Cincinnati, O., Nov. 29, 1842. He served in an Ohio regiment during the Civil war and was a member of the G.A.R. He had resided in Decatur for the last thirty-seven years. He was a contracting plasterer and was well known. He was a member of the First Christian church. He was twice married.

His first wife was Alvira Gaddis, who died many years ago. His second wife was Mary Josephine Dragunier. He is survived by his wife and three children, George McGlennen of Broderick, Cal., Mrs. Maude Smith, also living in California, and Mrs. Beulah Mier of Decatur. There are eight grand-children. The body was removed to the LA. Monson undertaking establishment and prepared for burial.

Decatur Review, Decatur IL, 23 Feb 1926, pg. 3

The obituary for his wife, Mary J., was published in the Decatur Daily Review, Decatur Illinois, 27 Aug 1926, pg. 24





  McGONNIGLE, Alice

Alice, the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John McGonnigle, who lives on East Condit street, died of teething early yesterday morning. The funeral will take place today at three o’clock from St. Patrick’s Catholic church, Rev. Father Mackin officiating.

The Daily Review, Decatur, IL, 23 Mar 1886



  McGOODWIN, William   

William McGoodwin, colored, died at 5 o’clock Sunday eveing at his home, 878 West Marietta street. Paralysis and old age caused his death. McGoodwin was born over eighty years ago. He was a slave till the war. When Negro regiments were formed he entered the army and served till the end of the war. He was a member of Dunham post, No. 141, G.A.R. In 1866 he came to Illinois.

He leaves three children, Mrs. Fannie Rice, Mrs. M.E. Moore and A.W. McGoodwin. He also leaves one grandchild. The funeral will be held at 3 o’clock Wednesday afternoon from the A.M.E. church. The casket will not be open at the church and those who wish to see the body should call at the house.

The Daily Review, Decatur IL, 1 Aug 1904.





  McGOWAN, Catherine (Lawler)

MRS. M'GOWAN DIES AT DUNN RESIDENCE

She Had Lived in Decaur Many Years

Mrs. Catherine McGowan died at 5:10 Friday afternoon at the residence of her granddaughter, Mrs. E. F. Dunn, 233 West Cerro Gordo Street. Her death was caused by uremic (sic) poisoning. Mrs. McGowan was seventy-six years old and had lived in Decatur for many years. She was a member of St. Patrick's Catholic church. She was a native of Queen's County, Ireland. She came to the United States when she was only sixteen years old. For awhile the family lived in St. Louis. She was the widow of Fenton McGowan, whose death occurred about nineteen years ago. She is survived by three children, Mrs. P. Kilkeary, Thomas F. McGowan and Mrs. J.L.Gogerty. She also leaves one sister, Mrs. Humprey White besides nineteen grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren. The funeral will be held at 9 o'clock Monday morning. The services will be conducted by Rev. Father J. Murphy, Requiem high mass will be celebrated. The internment will be in Calvary.

FUNERAL

The funeral of Mrs. Catherine McGowan will be held at 9 o'clock Monday morning at St. Patrick's church. Burial will be at Calvary.

The Daily Review (Decatur), Saturday, 2 December 1911, p. 8

Submitted by:Kay Robinson

Catherine Lawler McGowan was the submitter's gr-great-grandmother.





  McGOWAN, Elizabeth (Dunn)

MRS. McGOWAN ILL FOR MANY MONTHS

Woman, Loved By Many, Dies in Home

Mrs. Elizabeth McGowan, wife of Thomas McGowan, died at 4:30 o'clock Monday afternoon died in the family residence, 525 North Franklin Street. She was 50 years old last December. Her death was caused by cancer of the stomach. She had been in failing health for some time, and during the last nine weeks had been confined to her bed. Mrs. McGowan knew that the end was near and she knew that the fact was known to her family, but she tried to keep them from knowing how she suffered and she was cheerful and patient through it all. She possessed a cheerful disposition and was never happier than when doing something for others and she was loved by all that knew her.

Mrs. McGowan's maiden name was Elizabeth A. Dunn. She was born near Warrensburg December 8, 1868. The family moved to near Dalton City when she was a little girl and she lived there until she was grown. For a number of years she was a school teacher and the friendships she made among her pupils endured all through life. She was a member of St. Patrick's Catholic Church and one of the most popular women among the congregation. She and Thomas McGowan were married October 10, 1892 and they have made their home in Decatur.

HUSBAND AND CHILDREN

Mrs. McGowan leaves her husband and the following children: Mrs. Irvin Vollmer of Dalton City, Miss Mary McGowan, Miss Nellie McGowan, Edwin McGowan, Emmett McGowan, Virgil McGowan and Miss Elizabeth McGowan all of Decatur. She also leaves a brother John Dunn of Dalton City, and the following sisters: Mrs. Anna Heneberry of Dalton City, Mrs. Minnie Nolan of Las Vegas, N.M., and Mrs. Nellie McCarty of Haskell, Okla.

The funeral will be held at 9 o'clock Wednesday morning in St. Patrick's Catholic Church. The services will be conducted by Rev. Father J. Murphy. Burial will be in Calvary.

Decatur Review, Tuesday, April 15, 1919 - Page 4, Column 3

FUNERALS

Mrs. Thomas McGowan

The funeral of Mrs. Thomas McGowan was held at 9 o'clock Wednesday morning in St. Patrick's Catholic Church. There was a large attendance, the church being filled with friends. More than fifty automobiles were in the cortege. Solemn high mass was celebrated by Rev. Father J. Murphy as celebrant, Rev. Father Curran of Dalton City as deacon, and Rev. Father Cowden as sub-deacon.

Music was furnished by the regular choir of the church and there was also a solo by Miss Margaret Delaney. There were many beautiful floral tributes in charge of Miss Loretta Malefant, Miss Ellen O'Heran, Miss Geneva Mooney, Miss Helen Henneberry, Miss Bessie Henneberry, Miss Louise Vollmer, Miss Erma Dunn and Miss Imelda Dunn.

The bearers were Joseph Connaghan, P. W. Finn, Dan Higgins, P. J. McGuire, John Fitzgerald and George Goodman. Burial was in Calvary Cemetery.

Submitted by:Kay Robinson

Elizabeth McGowan was the submitter's gr-grandmother.





  McGOWAN, Fenton

At his home, NO. 806 Conlit Street, Fenton McGowan, aged 70 years, died of dropsy at 11 o'clock p.m. Monday March 20 (1893). The deceased had been ill so as to be confined to his home for two weeks past, and his advanced age made it impossible for him to withstand the inroads made upon his strength by the malady with which he was afflicted. He is survived by his wife and three children, Mrs. Patrick Kilkerry, Mrs. James Gogerty and Thomas McGowan, all of Decatur. The deceased had been a constant resident of Decatur for almost forty years, with the exception of seven years, when he made his home in St. Louis, and from which city he returned to Decatur about eight years ago.

Weekly Herald Dispatch (Decatur), 25 March 1893

Submitted by:Kay Robinson

Fenton McGowan was the submitter's gr-great-grandfather.



  McGOWAN, Samuel   

Captain Samuel McGowan died at 5:20 Tuesday evening at the family residence, 1303 North College street. He was eighty-seven years old and his death was due to the infirmities of age. Besides his wife, he is survived by one son, Charles McGowan, of Fresno, Cal., and four daughters, Mrs. W. M. McKelvy and Mrs. F.G. Stewart of Chicago, Mrs. A.S. Kazar and Miss Lydia McGowan, both of Decatur.

Samuel McGowan was a native of Piqua, O. He was born Jan. 11, 1824. He came to Illinois in 1856, and for a number of years engaged in the hotel business at Clinton, Farmer City and LeRoy. In 1884 he was elected sheriff of Dewitt county. He was a veteran of the Civil war, serving as Captain of company A, One Hundred and Seventh Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He was a member of the Methodist church of Piqua, O. He was also a member of Dunham post 141, G.A.R. of Decatur and of macon lodge No. 8, A.F. & A. Masons.

The Daily Review, Decatur IL, 4 Jan 1911





  McGOWAN, Thomas

Tom McGowan, Hotel Owner Dies in Hospital

Thomas McGowan, 86, one of the owners and operators of the Kraft Hotel, 555 North Front Street, died at 11:15 am today in St. Mary's hospital where he had been a patient for the last three months.

Mr. McGowan who was associated with the late Edward F. Dunn and the late George Kraft in building and operating the hotel had been active in the business from its construction in 1907 until about six months ago.

Mr. McGowan was born in St. Louis, Mo., Nov., 27, 1861, the son of Fenton and Catherine McGowan. He had made his home in Decatur since graduating from the Christian Brothers college in St. Louis when he was a young man.

He was married to Elizabeth Dunn of Decatur, Oct. 19, 1892. She preceded him in death, April 15, 1917. He leaves three sons, Dr. E. McGowan and Attorney Virgil McGowan of Decatur and Dr. E. C. McGowan, Chicago; three daughters, Mrs. Nellie Talbott and Mrs. Elizabeth White of Decatur and Mrs. Mary Reis, Chicago and nine grandchildren. The body was taken to Moran & Sons funeral home. Funeral arrangements are incomplete.

Decatur Review, August 20, 1948

Submitted by:Kay Robinson

Thomas McGowan was the submitter's great-grandfather.





  McGOWAN, Thomas

Has Pneumonia

Thomas McGowan, a student in the law department of the University of Illnois is now in his home, 635 North Franklin Street, suffering with pneumonia

The Daily Review (Decatur), Tuesday, 14 December 1915, p. 14

FUNERAL

The funeral of Thomas McGowan will be held at 9 o'clock Friday morning at St. Patrick's Catholic church and burial will be in Calvary Cemetery.

The Daily Review (Decatur), Wednesday, 22 December 1915

Submitted by:Kay Robinson



  McGUIRE, C. Bernard   

After an illness of but five days C. Bernard McGuire died Sunday morning in the Decatur and Macon County hospital from pneumonia. Funeral services were conducted Tuesday afternoon in Grace Methodist Episcopal church and burial was in Fairlawn. (Picture included with obituary.)

The Decatur Daily Review, Decatur IL, 17 Apr 1928, pg. 2





  McKOWN, Mary V. (Greenfield)
    Born: c. 1906 in Long Creek, Macon Co.
    Died: 25 Sep 1974 in Decatur, Macon Co, IL
    Buried: Long Creek Cem, Macon Co, IL
    Parents:
    Married:
    Children:




  McLAUGHLIN, Nellie (Huston)
    Born:
    Died: 23 Jan 1951 in Clinton, DeWitt Co, IL
    Buried:
    Parents:
    Married:
    Children:




  McLEAN, Maria (Jones)

Mrs. Maria McLEAN, aged 92 years, 3 months and 20 days, died at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. E.T. CLEMENTS in Blue Mound, Illinois, 23 July 1901. Her death was due to old age and prostration from heat. Deceased maiden name was Maria JONES. She was born in Greenville, East Tennessee, 3 April 1809, and when 9 years old her parents moved to Union County, Indiana, where at the age of 19 years she was married to Wm. MC LEAN. Shortly after their marriage, they moved to Boone County, Indiana, residing there until 1867 when they moved to Westville, Indiana, at which place a year later her husband died. After his death she went to Chicago and was living there at the time of the great fire in 1870. Afterward she went back to the old neighborhood in Boone County and lived there several years, and finally gave up housekeeping and divided her time with her daughters.

Mrs. MC LEAN was the mother of ten children, six of whom are living. J.W. at Joplin, Missouri, Thomas S. at Alamo, Arkansas, Mrs. Margaret GIBSON at Jamestown, Indiana, Mrs. Anna M. HUDSON, Chicago, Illinois, Mrs. Emily D. COCHRAN, New Haven, Indiana, and Mrs. E.T. CLEMENTS at Blue Mound, Illinois, one daughter, Ellen PIERSOL, died at Westville, Indiana, one son, Albert at Danville, Indiana, and two sons, Samuel and William, were in the Federal Army during the Civil War. Samuel was killed in battle at Port Gibson and William died in the hospital at Gallatin, Tennessee.

Deceased was a member of the Christian Church for 68 years and when in her prime was a teacher in the Sunday School and an active helper in all church work. She died in full faith of meeting her loved ones in the home beyond.

(Blue Mound, Illinois Leader.)

* Note from submitter Janet ISLEY Price, I am posting this article for the others. I am not related to this subject. This obituary was originally typed up by The Leader Newspaper of Blue Mound, Illinois. All of the text is complete, no mention of her parents names were given. Her birthplace is spelled as written in the original newspaper text.





  McMAHON, Son

The seven-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Michael McMahon died on Sunday evening after a brief illness. The funeral will take place this morning at half past nine o'clock from St. Patrick's Catholic church.

Daily Review, Decatur, IL, 25 May 1886





  McMULLEN, Mollie Louella

Again the death angel has called in the family of Mr. and Mrs. Frank McMullen and has taken from their tender care their beloved and most beautiful little daughter, Mollie Louella, aged twenty months and sixteen days. The dear little child had the whooping-cough, and at times when it had to cough it seemed almost an impossibility to do so without strangling or choking. Saturday morning at two o'clock it had a severe attack of coughing when it strangled, and it spite of all efforts to save it, it died from choking and strangulation. The funeral took place at the Cumberland Presbyterian church on Sunday at eleven o'clock, conducted by the Rev. W.H. Schwarts, of the Methodist church. The remains were interred in the Cumberland cemetery.

The Daily Review, Decatur, IL, 25 Feb 1886



  McWHINNEY, John   

John McWhinney, after an illness which extended over a period of several years, died Sunday afternoon at 4:20 o’clock at his home on North Park street. The deceased was born August 19, 1842, at Brooklyn, N.Y. and after coming west enlisted in Company B, 116th Illinois Infantry, July 30, 1862, as a private and was mustered out as a corporal June 7, 1867. His war record was a splendid one, as one veteran fervently remarked this morning that “there never was a better soldier than Jack McWhinney.” At the close of the war, he settled in Decatur, where the family has since resided. In 1878 while Mr. McWhinney was in Chicago he was knocked down by a hose wagon and run over, since which time he has been in failing health. During his lifetime, Mr. McWhinney has served several terms as constable with credit.

The deceased is survived by a widow and two sons, Tom McWhinney, of Morrisonville, and Goldson McWhinney, of Englewood. One son, Charles McWhinney, died in 1873. A sister, Mrs. W.J. Crow, of Crayton, Neb., and another sister, Mrs. Jos. G?vey, of New York City, also survive him. A brother, Thomas McWhinney, is located somewhere in the west.

Decatur Weekly Republican, Decatur IL, 22 Feb 1894



  McWILLIAMS, James   

James McWilliams, son of John and Mary McWilliams, was born in Franklin county Ohio, Oct 15, 1830. He died at this home in Warrensburg Illinois, Tuesday morning March 15th 1904 aged 73 years and 5 months.

He was married to Belinda Bowen on the 10th day of August 1852. To them were born ten children six of whom survive him. They are, Mrs. T.J. Zimmerman of Lima, Ohio, L.S. and W.O. McWilliams of East St. Louis Ill., Mrs. Chas Albert, F.L. and ?.T. McWilliams of Warrensburg, Ill, Caroline, Ellen, Ida and John P. dying between the ages of 15 and 32 years.

James McWilliams moved to Warrensburg Nov 2nd 1886 and has since made that place his home. He was member of the 95th Ohio Volunteer Infantry and a member of the Grand Army of the Republic. He also belonged to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows.

He was a member of the Methodist church for a period of fifty years living a Christian life before the world and his family . He was a kind and indulgent husband and father and beloved by his family and friends. His quiet unassuming personality will be missed but his quiet Christian influence will live on in the hearts of those who knew him best.

The funeral took place on Thursday morning March 17 at 10 o’clock from the Methodist church. The funeral obsequies were conducted by Rev. R.E. Pierce assisted by Rev. H.W. Kruzan and were very improvessive. A choir composed of Mr. and Mrs. C.A. Dresbach, Mrs. George Bunket and C.C. Cowen with Mrs. C.J. Tucker at the organ furnished appropriate and touching music. The selections were Nearer My God to Thee, A Home Over There and God Be With You Till We Meet Again.

The floral offerings were profuse and beautiful. At the back of the pulpit was draped a large American flag and the somber effects of the black drapery was relieved by a profusion of small flags. The Odd Fellows attended in a body and took charge of the body after the funeral services. The pall bearers were C.J. Tucker, R.H. Schroeder, H.E. Peverly, George Culp, Charles Faith and Elias Holler.

Decatur Herald, Decatur IL, 25 Mar 1904, pg. 3



  MEAD, John   

John Mead was found dead in bed Monday morning at his home at 340 Wabash avenue. It is supposed that death was caused by Bright’s disease. He had been suffering severely from that for some time, though he had not been confined to the house.

The family did not know he was any worse than usual. As far as they know he slept as usual.

Mrs. Mead heard him cough in his room at about 8 o’clock this morning, but did not go in. At 9 o’clock she went in and found him dead.

He was about 70 years old and was a member of the G.A.R. He was the father of Frank Mead, the letter carrier, and Misses Anna and Alice Mead, the school teachers. He was a machinist and the last work he did was at the Leader factory.

Mr. Mead was also a member of Decatur lodge No 65, I.O.O.F. He was well known and was held in high esteem. The funeral will be held some time Wednesday, but the hour has not yet been decided on.

The Daily Review, Decatur IL, 9 Jan 1905





  MERIWEATHER, Hester Austin
Died This Morning

Mrs. H.A. Meriweather Passes Away at Her Home in Long Creek Township

Mrs. H.A. Meriweather, wife of Reuben H. Meriweather, died this morning at 10:20 o’clock at her home in Long Creek township of paralysis. The venerable lady has been failing for some time. The deceased was aged 70 years.

The family moved to this county from Baltimore, Md., in June 1858, and have since resided here. Deceased leaves a husband and three sons living; they are, J.A. Meriweather, H. Meriweather and Will Meriweather. One daughter, Miss Mollie, having passed away about a year ago.

The time for the funeral has not been set, but it will probably occur tomorrow afternoon.

Daily Republican, (Decatur, Illinois), 15 Jul 1895

Submitted by:Sharon Pike, President, The Meriwether Society, Inc.





  MERIWEATHER, Mary Roper

Mary Roper Meriweather died of a complication of diseases at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Meriweather, in Long Creek township, Thursday night, Oct. 18, at 10:20 o’clock, aged about 37 years. Miss Meriweather has been an invalid for a long time. She was a native of Baltimore, Md., having been [born] there Nov. 7, 1857. She is survived by her parents and three brothers. They are J. A. Meriweather, Will Meriweather and Herbert Meriweather.

Herald-Dispatch (Decatur, Illinois), 20 Oct 1894

Submitted by:Sharon Pike, President, The Meriwether Society, Inc.





  MERRIS, Clayton C.
    Born: 16 Sep 1866
    Died: 25 Feb 1906 in Macon Co, IL
    Buried: Greenwood Cem, Macon Co, IL
    Parents:
    Married:
    Children:




  MERRIS, Ellery M.

E.M. Merris was born in Sangamon Co., Ill in 1823. With his parents he moved when quite young to Scott County where he spent his boyhood and young manhood days. In 1842 he was married to Miss Nancy VanGundy and they lived together almost sixty-four years. There was born to them a large family, eight of whom are living. They are Asa and John Merris, Mrs. John Armstrong of Macon, Mrs. Blair and Mrs. Combs of Findlay, Mrs. Renshaw of Henry, Okla and Mrs. McCool of Pattensburg, MO. In 1865 they moved to Macon county where he has lived since. Mr. Merris died Monday night February 26 about midnight. His death was the result of a paralytic stroke.

Decatur Herald, 2 Mar 1906





  MERRIS, Ida May (Armstrong)

Insane after her husband's horrible death, Mrs. Ida M. Merris, 1344 North College street, shot and killed herself at her home before 7 o'clock Monday morning (18 Jun 1906). She deliberately faced a mirror, placed the gun behind her right ear, and fired a bullet through her head at the base of the brain. As she fell she discharged a second shot which, however, did not hit her.

Her two daughter, Edith, aged 11, and Ella, aged 9, were in the house at the time. They were the first to the body.

The suicide is the tragic sequel to a recent pathetic death. Not four months ago Clayton C. Merris fell from a scaffold whil he was working in the new Wait Building and shortly after died from his injuries. Mrs. Merris brooded deeply over his death. To add to her troubles, her older daughter, Edith, lately caught diptheria. The disease had left but the quarantine had not been lifted when Mrs. Merris' mind already unbalanced, gave way to her suicidal inclinations.

Her daughters noticed nothing unusual about her Monday morning. Her neighbor, Mrs. O.S. Prather, saw her before the shooting and thought her the same as always. While the girls were washing the breakfast dishes in the kitchen, Mrs. Merris went into a bedroom and fired the fatal shot.

The two girls rushedinto the room to find their mother, the revolver still in her hand, on the floor with blood rushing from the gaping wound in her head. Mrs. Prather, whose house is only a few from the Merris house, was only a minute behind the girls. She had heard both shots, the second of which shattered the bedroom window. She immediately telephoned for Dr. A. F. Wilhelmy, who had been treating the diphtheria patient. By the time he arrived, shortly after 7 o'clock, Mrs. Merris was dead, not having regained consciousness. The bullet passed clear through her head. Dr. T.C. Buxton, the coroner, was called at 7:30.

Mrs. Merris' suicide did not surprise neighbors. They say her mind has not been altogether normal for ten years. She was subject to moods of melancholy before her husband's death. Since the accident the mood has been continual and the melancholy concentrated and abject. Mrs. Merris had two or three times threatened to kill herself. She was regarded as insane.

The revolver was in the house because Mrs. Merris wanted it for protection. Afraid that something might happen to her, she kept it near at hand. The gun is an American bulldog of 32 calibre. The coroner found in it three empty shells, of which one had evidently been discharged some time age, and two loaded cartridges.

The body was removed to Brintlinger and Hawkins' undertaking establishment, pending the arrival of Mrs. Merris' son, Earl, aged 14, and her brother-in-law, Charles Merris, a Mt. Zion farmer. Earl Merris was visiting his uncle. The boy and his two sisters are the only children.

The inquest was set for 4 o'clock Monday afternoon. The two daughters, Mrs. Prather, another neighbor and Dr. Wilhelmy were expected to be the only witnesses.

Mrs. Merris leaves her children in fair financial condition. Besides her husband's insurance, $2,200, she had a house at 1344 North College street left by him.

Mrs. Merris was the widow of Clayton C. Merris, a well known carpenter, who was killed by a fall from scaffolding Feb 26, while he was working in the Wait building. His death received wide notice because of his prominence in the carpenters' union and local Woodman organizations.

The Merris family came to Decatur twelve or thirteen years ago. Mr. and Mrs. Merris had three children, the oldest 14 years of age and the youngest 9.

Decatur Review, Mon, June 18, 1906, p. 15

(Ida Merris was born 21 Jul 1865, she was buried in Greenwood Cem.)




  MERRIS, Nancy M. (Vangundy)

Mrs. Nancy M. Merris died at 4 o'clock Thursday afternoon, aged 85 years. The funeral will be held at 2 o'clock Saturday afternoon.

The Daily Review(Decatur), 28 Feb 1908



  MERRITT, Leroy   

Leroy Merritt, 1241 East Marietta street, for many years well known as a teamster, died Thursday afternoon at 2:45 o’clock in Macon County hospital, where he had been a patient since last Friday. His death was due to heart disease. His health had been noticeably failing for the last month; a week ago he suffered a complete collapse and was taken to the hospital.

Leroy Merritt was born, July 2, 1881, in Decatur and except when in military service, all of his life had been passed in Decatur. When the war between Germany and England broke in 1914, he went to Canada and enlisted with First Canadian Engineers. He went overseas and during three years active service with his command in France, escaped without a wound. He was married to Anna Gill in England in 1918. She then was in military service with the commissary department of Canadian forces. He leaves his wife and five children; Robert, Anna Isabel, Beulah, William and Roderick; also his mother, Mrs. W.E. Walters, his brother Charles H. Merritt, his sisters, Mrs. R.M. Bess and Mrs. L.D. High, all of Decatur; also a son by his first marriage, Charles Merritt of Moberly, Mo.

The body was taken to the undertaking rooms of Moran & Sons. The time of the funeral has not been announced.

Decatur Evening Herald, Decatur IL, 11 Feb 1927, pg. 3



  MIKESELL, Earl W.   

Earl W. Mikesell, 86, 0f 1159 North Morgan St. died 9 a. m. Tuesday in Decatur Memorial Hospital. Funeral arrangements are incomplete at Dawson & Wikoff Funeral Home. Burial will be in Graceland Cemetery. Mr. Mikesell was born in Milmine, a son of Andrew Jackson and Emma Mikesell. He was a member of First Christian Church, Veterans of Foreign Wars and the Railroad Clerks Union. He was a retired employee of the Wabash Railroad Co. and was a veteran of World War I. Mr. Mikesell married Josephine Heckman who died in 1946. In 1949 he married Leta Mier. Surviving are his wife; son, Robert P. of Decatur; stepsons, Jay Gordon Mier of Knoxville, Tenn.; Donald Mier of Hemet, Calif.; brothers Carl of Decatur; Charlie of Lovington; five grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. A son, two brothers and three sisters preceded him in death.

Decatur Review – 18 Mar 1975 – Pg. 13 (2nd obit 19 Mar 1975, pg. 32)



  MIKESELL, Harold E.   
Pfc. Mikesell Dies in Korea

Pfc. Harold E. Mikesell, 27, was killed in action in Korea Nov 4, according to word received today by his father, Edward W. Mikesell, 1159 North Morgan Street.

Private Mikesell was previously reported as missing in action in Korea on July 27 and the family had had no word from him. His last letter was written from Okinawa July 4. Although the circumstances of his death were not given members of the family think that he may have been among captured American soldiers.

He was a member of the medical corps and went overseas in June. He was a veteran of World War II and served in Europe. He leaves a father, stepmother and a brother, Robert P. Mikesell, with the air force in Alaska.

Decatur Review, 26 Jan 1950, pg. 18 (Photo)





  MILLER, Abraham

ABRAHAM MILLER DIES WEDNESDAY

Veteran Resident of Macon County Had Been in Failing Health

Abraham C. Miller, 1120 East Leafland avenue, died in his home at 5 oclock Wednesday morning. He was 87 years old. His death followed two weeks confinement to his bed as a result of a complication of diseases. He had been in failing health for some time.

Mr. Miller in born Sept. 17, 1810 in Macon county and has lived in or near Decatur for the greater part of his life. He was married to Lucy A. Miller of Monticello on March 10, 1862. To this union were born three children, all of whom survive him. They are: Mrs. Ellen Markies, Buffalo Gap, S.D.; James M. Miller of Clinton and Albert W. Miller of Decatur.

On Jan 30, 1873 he married Nancy Austin who died May 31, 1901. Ten children were born to this union, five of whom survive Mr. Miller. These are: Mrs. Eva Hill, Ramsey; Mrs. Hattie Campbell, Mrs. Lucy Reinhart, Mrs. Etta Arthur Wolverton, and Miss Nellie Miller, all of Decatur. He leaves 20 grand children and 14 great grandchildren.

The house in which Mr. Miller was born still stands just west of the aviation field on the Springfield road west of Decatur. He was a member of the Baptist church.

The body was taken to the Moran funeral home and prepared for burial. Funeral services will be held at 2 oclock Friday afternoon. The body will remain in the Moran chapel where friends may call up to the time for the funeral.

Decatur Evening Herald, 7 Mar 1928





  MILLER, Mrs. Frank

DIED - In this city, at 1045 Marietta street, Aug. 26, of childbirth, Mrs. Frank Miller, aged 27 years. Deceased was a daughter of Charles Adams. Funeral from Stapp's Chapel Wednesday afternoon at 3 o'clock.

The Daily Republican, Decatur, IL, Tuesday, 26 Aug 1884





  MILLER, Infant Son

Died Last Evening

The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Miller died last evening at 10 o'clock at the home of George Stare on North Franklin street, of cholera infantum, aged four months.

Mr. and Mrs. Miller reside in Riverside, Cal., and are here attending the bedside of George Stare, Mrs. Miller's father, who is lying dangerously ill at his home on North Franklin street.

The hour of the funeral and place of burial have not been decided upon as yet.

Decatur Daily Republican, 10 Oct 1891





  MILLER, Philip   

A SUDDEN DEATH

Philip Miller, father of Elmer E. Miller, dropped dead this morning at his home on North Morgan street, in the presence of his wife. Mr. Miller, who has been employed by the American Express company since last fall, had been ill for a period of four weeks, suffering with an attack of congestion of the lungs. He came down town Saturday and arranged to go to work this morning. He got up early, ate his breakfast and his wife put his dinner in his bucket. He was not in the habit of going to dinner as the distance was too great. He had stepped to the window to look out. As he did so he fell back without uttering a word and died in his wife's arms. Death probably resulted from heart disease. The deceased was a veteran of the late war and leaves a widow and three children. He was past 50 years of age. The time of the funeral is not fixed. He will be buried with military honors by members of the Grand Army Post.

Decatur Daily Republican, 14 Feb 1887





  MILLMAN, Mary

The funeral of Miss Mary Millman will be held at 10:30 this morning at Brintlinger & Son's chapel. The interment will be in Greenwood. Miss Millman lived at 437 East William instead of 427.

Decatur Review, 26 Oct 1913





  MILLS, Eliza (Lansing)

The funeral services over the remains of the late Mrs. Joseph Mills will be held this afternoon at three o’clock, at the family residence on North Main street. Rev. Dr. Vosburgh will conduct the services.

The Daily Review, Decatur, IL, 4 Mar 1886

The funeral services over the remains of the late Mrs. Joseph Mills were held at three o’clock yesterday afternoon, as the family residence on North Main street. Before that hour arrived the house was completely filled with relatives and friends of the departed. The remains rested in a beautiful black cloth casket, bearing a silver plate with the simple inscription, "Mrs. Eliza Mills. Died March 2nd, 1886." There was a profusion of floral offerings, many of which were beautiful in design. A choir composed of Prof. S.M. Lutz, Mrs. O.F. Spaulding, Mrs. Harry Crea and others, furnished appropriate music. The sad services were opened with the singing of "Nearer My God to Thee." Rev. Dr. Vosburgh conducted the services and preached a tender funeral sermon. He chose for his text, “Jesus Only,” Matt. 17:8. The subject of his remarks was the consolation of the gospel of Christ in death. The deceased was a member of the Baptist church, having united with it years ago. Dr. Vosburgh alluded to the noble nature and good deeds of the dead, spoke of her long residence in this community, and paid a fitting tribute to her memory. He offered words of consolation to the grief stricken family. At the close of the sermon the choir sang, "Jesus, Lover of My Soul." A fervent prayer was offered by Rev. Vosburgh, and the services at the house closed with the choir singing, "Asleep in Jesus." The remains were followed to Greenwood cemetery by a large number of people. After brief services the remains were committed to the tomb. The pall bearers were Judge W. E. Nelson, W.R. Scruggs, W.T. Wells, H.W. Waggoner, John Ullrich and E. McClellan.

The Daily Review, Decatur, IL, 5 Mar 1886

More than the brief mention that she died and that the obsequies were observed, is die to the memory and virtues of our townswoman, Mrs. Eliza, wife of our fellow townsman, Joseph Mills. For nearly the life of a generation she has lived among us and we have felt the benign influence of her sweet and gentle character in the relations of wife, mother, neighbor and friend. In all of which have been illustrated the beauties of her true womanliness.

Eliza Lansing was born in the city of New York on the 27th day of April, 1827. Before she was seven years old death deprived her of both her parents. For the next fourteen years of her life she was the subject of the maternal care of her grandmother, resident in the state of New Jersey. She was married to Mr. Mills in the city of New York on the 18th of May, 1848. The young husband and wife resided in Newark, New Jersey, until May, 1853, when they removed to and settled in Decatur, Illinois. In her sixteenth year Mrs. Mills united with the Second Baptist church at Plainfield, New Jersey, since which time her life has been an exemplification of Christian fidelity and virtue.

On the morning of Tuesday, the 2nd instant, she breakfasted with her family in usual health, and they separated for their usual avocations, to be summed to her death-bed before ten o’clock of the same morning. Her few words after the fatal stroke were words of grateful appreciation of the ministrations of the kind friends who gathered about her dying couch, and of yearning affection for the dear ones from whom she was being so suddenly severed. She leaves mourning her loss her loving husband and daughters, Mrs. Anne, wife of Mr. John Shellabarger, of Salina, Kansas, and Misses Stella and Corinne Mills. May Heaven help and sooth the stricken hearted. Those of us who remember Decatur thirty years ago and since, will always remember too the gentle deeds of goodness of her who has been summoned so suddenly from our midst.

I am requested by the family to tender their most grateful acknowledgment of the kindness and sympathy of the friends who have stood so near them in this sad hour of their deep affliction.

The Daily Review, Decatur, IL, 6 mar 1886





  MILLSPAUGH, William

This morning at 2 o'clock William Millspaugh passed away in death at the home of his brother, J.C. Millspaugh, Jr., 318 West Cerro Gordo street, in the 30th year of his age. He had been ill for a number of weeks, due to an attack of bilateral pneumonia, and died despite the best medical attendance and personal attention. He was never very strong and his affliction weakened him rapidly.

The deceased was born in Decatur January 10, 1869, and was a son of Mr. and Mrs. J.C. Millspaugh, Sr. He was married to Julia Smith, at Corsicana, Texas, March 19, 1892. There are no children. He is survived by his wife, his parents, a sister, Emma Millspaugh, and three brothers, E.S., C.H. and J.C. Millspaugh, Jr. By profession the deceased was a theatrical performer, having appeared with vaudeville companies in the larger cities during the past 10 years. He was a very clever artist, doing gentlemanly acts and sketches. Will was a young man of genial disposition, who had hosts of personal friends in many cities.

The funeral will take place from the home of the parents at 317 South Franklin street, Satruday, April 16, at 2:30 p.m.

Daily Republican, Decatur, IL, 14 Apr 1898





  MILTON, Charles

DIED - In Springfield, on Sunday, 5th inst., Charles Milton, son of Preston and Catherine M. Butler - aged 8 years and 8 months.

Illinois State Chronicle (Decatur), 18 Sep 1856





  MINICK, Susah (Hudgen)

Mrs. Christopher Minick, who died Sunday, May 8, at her home four miles northwest of Cerro Gordo, was 46 years old. Miss Susan Hudgen was born in Hardin county, Ky., April 17. With her father's family she moved to Illinois in 1848, and in 1849 settled on a farm two miles west of Cerro Gordo. She was married Dec. 6, 1861, to Christopher Minick. Three children were born to them. One brother and one sister, together with many friends are left to mourn her loss. The funeral took place from the brick church northwest of Cerro Gordo. Rev. Martin, assisted by Rev. Augustus, conducted the service. The burial was at the Peck cemetery. The pall bearers were Hanson Peck, J.K. Peck, M. Wood, J.J. Garver, Colonel Shively and Henry Martin. The floral offerings included a sheaf of wheat and a wreath. A large number of friends attended the obsequies.

Decatur Daily Republican, 12 May 1892





  MITCHELL, Bessie L. (Florey)
    Born: Jun 13, 1888 in Decatur, Macon Co, IL
    Died: 18 Jan 1971 in Towner Co., ND
    Buried:
    Parents: Marion Franklin & Mary Ellen (Ishler) Florey
    Married: Sep 15, 1906 in Macon Co, IL to Walter Steward Mitchel
    Children:




  MITCHELL, Elizabeth (Moore)

OLDEST PERSON IN DECATUR IS DEAD

Mrs. Elizabeth Mitchell Passes Away at the Age of 98

Mrs. Elizabeth Mitchell died at 5:30 o'clock Sunday morning at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. George M. Wood, 261 Prairie avenue. She was probably the oldest person in Decatur, having passed her 98th birthday March 19.

She had been an invalid for a number of years and for two years she had been confined to her bed being almost helpless from paralysis and was able to be up only occasionally for a short time.

BIRTHDAY DINNER

On Monday, March 19, a number of relatives gathered at the Wood residence for a family dinner in honor of Mrs. Mitchell's 98th birthday. Since then she has failed steadily. She is survived by a son W.F. Edmundson of San Jose, Cal., and by two daughters Mrs. George M. Wood of Decatur and Mrs. J.L. Shellabarger of Topeka, Kan. She also leaves ten grandchildren and nine great grandchildren.


THE FUNERAL

The funeral will be held at 2:30 Tuesday afternoon from the residence on Prairie avenue. The services will be conducted by Rev. W.J. Davidson and the interment will be at Greenwood.

BORN IN ILLINOIS

Mrs. Mitchell was born near Belleville, Ills., March 19, 1808. Her father, James Moore, was the first male white child born in the territory of which the state of Illinois is now a part. She was married three times, her last husband being Dr. W.H. Mitchell whom she married at Belleville. Before coming to Decatur in 1855 the family lived in Jacksonville. Mrs. Mitchell has made her home here since 1855. Her husband has been dead about sixteen years. She was a member of the Methodist church eighty-five years and was a sister of the late Dr. E.W. Moore.

Decatur Review, 2 Apr 1906





  MITCHELL, James S.   

James S. Mitchell, a veteran of the late war, died at 3:30 am Thursday, Feb. 27, at this home, No 332 East Marietta street, aged 62 years. He was born in London, England, and was a member of the Dunham Post, No. 141, G.A.R. He leaves a wife and four children, Alfred G., Charles E. and Edward Mitchell and Miss Myrtle Mitchell. The time of the funeral will be announced later.

The Daily Republican, Decatur IL, 27 Feb 1896, pg. 8





  MIXELL, Margaret (Wickline)

The funeral of Mrs. Geo. Mixell was held from the family residence, Friday morning March 11th at 9 o'clock. Interment in Illini cemetery.

Decatur Herald, 15 Mar 1904





  MOFFETT, Elizabeth C.

Miss Elizabeth C. Moffett died at 1:30 o'clock Friday morning at the home of her mother, Mrs. E.J. Moffett, 1311 North Monroe street. She was thirty-seven years old. She had been a suffered from heart trouble for a number of years, but her condition did not become serious until within the past few months. Miss Moffett was born near Boody and was a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian church. She is survived by her mother, five brothers and one sister, J.H. Moffett and Samuel R. Moffett of Decatur; W.P. Moffett of Marinette, Wis.; John A. Moffett of Kansas City, Kan.; Walter Moffett of Blue Mound, and Mrs. Carrie L. Weygandt of Decatur. The funeral will probaby be held on Sunday.

Decatur Review, 19 May 1916





  MOFFETT, Daughter

The infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W.P. Moffett died at 2:30 p.m. Saturday Nov. 23, at the family home in Blue Mound township, aged 5 weeks. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the C.P. church, in Blue Mound township. Rev. Mr. Keener will officiate and the burial will be at the Brown cemetery.

The Daily Review (Decatur), 24 Nov 1901





  MOFFETT, David S.

DEATH OF A GOOD CITIZEN

We are pained to report the death of David S. Moffett, a worthy man and excellent citizen, who died of erysipelas, at his residence in Blue Mound township, Tuesday afternoon. His remains were followed to the grave by a large concourse of relatives and friends, and the Masonic fraternity, of which order he was a member.

Decatur Republican, 14 May 1868





  MOFFITT, David C.

THE MOFFITT INQUEST

Verdict of the Jury - Death Due to Natural Causes

The inquest over the remains of the late David C. Moffitt was held this forenoon at 11 o'clock by Deputy Coroner Roy Bendure at the family home west of the city. The jury which was impanalled last night returned the following verdict:

"We, the jury, find from the evidence produced that the deceased came to his death from apoplexy."

The first witness was Charles May, grandson of the deceased, who testified as follows:

"Am a farm hand and have lived on the place for two months. Yesterday afternoon between 3 and 4 o'clock myself, Arthur White and my grandfather were in the timber. The deceased was splitting wood and we were sawing. He told us to take some wood to the house and he would stay and split for a while. White and myself came to the house and after a while my grandmother told me to ring the bell. This was at 4:40 o'clock. My grandfather did not come and I went to where he had been working to tell him to come to supper. I found him lying on his back. The left leg was cramped a little. I called the people at the house and Whilte, Miss Ann Moffitt and others came. The place where we were working is about a half mile from the house. The indications were that the deceased was preparing to go to the house when he fell over."

Arthur White was also sworn and testified that he had worked for Mr. Moffitt the past 17 months and corroborated the evidence of May.

Decatur Evening Republican, 2 Mar 1899

DAVID C. MOFFITT

Found Dead on His Farm West of Decatur

APOPLEXY WAS THE CAUSE

Deceased was Mayor of Decatur for One Term - Well Known Throughout the County - The News was a Shock

David C. Moffitt, ex-mayor of Decatur, was found dead at 7 o'clock Wednesday evening on his farm west of the city. Charles May, a grandson of the deceased, made the discovery and the news was soon brought to Decatur. The death was very sudden and it is supposed was caused by apoplexy. Dr. W.B. Hostetler was immediately summoned and stated that the indications were that apoplexy was the cause. When found the body was cold and life had passed out of it several hours before. At about noon yesterday Mr. Moffitt, accompanied by his grandson, Charles May, and a hired man, Arthur White, started to the timber, about three-quarters of a mile away, to cut wood. The three men worked until about 3 o'clock when Mr. Moffitt directed May and White to go to the house with a load of wood and do some other work. At 6 o'clock Mr. Moffitt had not yet returned. The bell was rung for him but he still did not return and May was sent to tell Mr. Moffitt to come to his supper. May went to the spot where he had left his grandfather and found him dead. The body was cold. Mr. Moffitt was lying on his back and death had evidently come very suddenly. His hat had fallen off and one knee was drawn up. May summoned other members of the family who quickly joined him. The physician was called but his services could be of no avail.

Deputy Coroner Roy Bendure was notified and went to the Moffitt farm shortly after 7 o'clock. He had the body removed to the residence and swore in the following jury: Dr. W.B. Hostetler, John Dipper, C.E. Nanna, Younger Filson, Jerry Miller and John Friend. The jury adjourned to meet at 11 o'clock this forenoon at the residence.

THE FUNERAL

The funeral will be held at the Moffitt residence at 10:30 o'clock Friday forenoon. Rev. A.W. Hawkings, pastor of the Cumberland Presbyterian church, will conduct the services and the members of the Celestial Lodge, Odd Fellows, will have charge of the burial and will hold their customary ritual services at the grave. The burial will be at Greenwood cemetery.

ALDERMEN WILL ATTEND

The members of the city council will attend the funeral in a body. The following notice is given the members:

"The aldermen of the city are requested to meet tomorrow forenoon at 10 o'clock at the court house to attend the funeral of the late ex-Mayor David C. Moffitt, which will be held at 10:30 o'clock. Carriages will be in waiting. FRANK ROBBINS, "Mayor Pro Tem."

BIOGRAPHY

David C. Moffitt was born at Brownsville, Pa., April 20, 1831. When 11 years old he came west with his parents and located in Ohio. At an early age Mr. Moffitt learned the bricklayers' trade, and was doing contract work before he was 21 years old. He followed the trade the greater portion of his life. He came to Illinois in 1855 and located in Piatt county, coming to Decatur March 4, 1856. During his residence here he engaged in brickmaking and contracting. He built a number of public school buildings and many of the business houses and private residences. He was nearly always busy, and during the building season kept a large force of men employed.

He married Miss Catherine Wilson at Circleville, Ohio, June 26, 1862. Four children were born to them: Charles, who has been associated with his father in business, Miss Annie Moffitt, who resides at home, Clara wife of Andrew Dempsey of Decatur, and Ida, who became the wife of H.F. May and died a short time afterward. The other children, with their mother, survive.

Mr. Moffitt was quite prominent in Odd Fellow circles, having been a member of the order for about 40 years. He has served as past Noble Grand, and as deputy in the grand lodge.

POLITICAL CAREER

Mr. Moffitt has always been a Democrat. In 1881 he was elected alderman from the Third ward and served in the council under Mayor Kanan and Mayor Waggoner. Six years ago he was nominated on the Democratic ticker for mayor and was elected by a majority of 87 votes, defeating Capt. M.F. Kanan. His election showed his personal popularity. Mr. Moffitt performed the duties of mayor of the city with the honesty and uprighteousness which always characterized his movements throughout his life. He was a friend of the colored man and was always ready to assist members of that race. He was also a friend of the laboring men. It will be remembered that when in 1897 the striking miners visited Decatur with the view of inducing the local miners to strike and were refused admittance to the city, Mr. Moffitt allowed the men to camp on his lawn and furnished them with food and assisted them in other ways. Both in the city and throughout the county Mr. Moffitt was held in high esteem. He had many friends and the news of his death was received with sorrow.

Decatur Evening Republican, 2 Mar 1899

FUNERAL SERVICES

Held Over the Remains of Late Ex-Mayor Moffitt

CITY OFFICIALS ATTENDED

And the Off Fellows Had Charge of the Burial - Rev. Hawkins Officiated at the House.

The funeral of the late ex-Mayor David C. Moffitt was held this forenoon at 10:30 o'clock at the family home west of the city and was largely attended. Persons were present from all parts of the county besides many from Decatur.

A number of the city officers were in attendance, among them being Acting Mayor Frank Robbins, several of the aldermen, Chief of Police W.W. Mason and five of the police force, the fire commissioners, ex-Mayor Kanan, Sheriff Lehman and a number of other citizens. The city officials met at the court house and drove to the residence.

The services were conducted by Rev. A.W. Hawkins, pastor of the Cumberland Presbyterian church. The minister preached an appropriate sermon in the course of which he referred in fitting terms to the life and character of the deceased. The music was rendered by the choir of the Cumberland Presbyterian church composed of E.E. Barnum, Arthur Dawson, Mrs. C.A. Logan and Miss Clara Baughm. The selections given were "Rock of Ages," "Thy Will Be Done" and a chant, "Sleep the Sleep." At the grave the last named selection was repeated.

The burial took place at Greenwood cemetery. The funeral cortege when the city was reached was met at Lincoln square by the members of Celestial Lodge, No. 186, and Canton Decatur No. 19, I.O.O.F., who acted as an escort to the cemetery and conducted the ritual service at the grave.

The pall bearers were I.W. Ehrman, J.L. Peake, Jesse Leforgee, T.L. Antrim, B.B. Babcock and J.G. Cloyd.

Daily Republican (Decatur), 3 Mar 1899





  MOFFETT, Sarah

DIED - In this city, on Wednesday morning, May 24, 1882, at 3 oclock, of rheumatism of the heart, Mrs. Sarah Moffett, aged 32 years. The deceased was the wife of Mr. J.E. Moffett, brother of Hon. W.T. Moffett, and a sister of Mrs. Jesse E. Bendure, at whose home on Cemetery street she died at the time stated. Mrs. Moffett has been in bad health for a year past. Her husband and three children, two sons and a daughter, survive her.

Decatur Daily Republican, 24 May 1882





  MONTGOMERY, B.F.   

B.F. Montgomery, an old resident of Decatur, died at 12:10 a.m. today at his home, 1155 North Union street. His death was caused by a complication of diseases and he has been in poor health for over a year. During the past five or six months he has been confined to his home.

The deceased was born in Virginia but has lived in or near Decatur since 1858. He was a farmer and was well known throughout the county. He was a veteran of the civil war and was a member of Company E, 159th Illinois volunteers. He leaves five children, all of Decatur, two brothers, J. H. and C.M. Montgomery, and one sister, Mrs. A. Rubicon. He was 54 years old.

The funeral will be held at 10 o’clock tomorrow forenoon at the home of C.M. Montgomery, 1155 North Union street. The interment will be at Mr. Gilead cemetery.

The Daily Republican, Decatur IL, 25 May 1898





  MONTGOMERY, Deborah

Mrs. Deborah Montgomery, wife of Samuel R. Montgomery, died on Tuesday at the family residence in Austin township. The funeral will take place this morning at ten o’clock from the residence. Rev. Sophia Gibb will conduct the services, and the remains will be interred in Greenwood cemetery. The friends of the family are invited to attend.

The Daily Review, Decatur, IL, 4 Mar 1886





  MOOMEY, Louis

The funeral of Louis Moomey will be held at 9:30 Sunday morning at the family residence, 1637 North Clinton street. The interment will be at Greenwood.

The Daily Review, Decatur, IL, 11 Dec 1909

The funeral of Louis Moomey was held at 9:30 Sunday morning at the family residence, 1637 North Clinton street. The services were conducted by Rev. E.H. Shuey, pastor of the United Brethren church. There was a large attendance of old friends and neighbors, and the employes of the Chambers, Bering & Quinlan factory atrtended in a body. The music was furnished by Miss Ulta Shuey, Miss Ada De Hart, Miss Letha Collins, Robert Gibson and F.G. Ruthrauff. The interment was at Greenwood.

The Daily Review, Decatur, Il, 13 Dec 1909





  MOORE, Child

J.E. Bendure, overseer of Greenwood cemetery, went down to Raymond yesterday morning, a distance of fifty miles, disinterred the remains of a child of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Moore, and returned to Decatur at noon. The body was buried in Greenwood cemetery yesterday afternoon.

The Daily Review, Decatur, IL, 4 Mar 1886



  MOORE, Cyrus L.   

Cyrus L. Moore, formerly of Decatur died Sunday at the Cook County hospital in Chicago, following a short illness of heart trouble. He was forty-seven years old last January.

Mr. Moore was born on a farm a few miles south of Decatur, January 21, 1879, and until he moved to Chicago twelve years ago all his life had been spent in his neighborhood. Before going to Chicago he worked for the Illinois Central. He also had served on the Decatur fire department.

He is survived by his mother Mrs. Maria Moore of Chicago and the following sisters and brothers: Mrs. Florence Hoover of Oklahoma, Mrs. Berta Pascoe of Peoria, Mrs. Helen Yeagle of Decatur, Arthur Moore and Catherine Moore of Chicago, Charles Moore of Plymouth and Rex Moore of Billings, Mont.

The body was brought to Decatur Friday morning and taken to the Moran and Sons chapel. The funeral was held in Chicago, but there were also short services at the grave in Illini cemetery near Warrensburg at 2:30 o’clock Friday afternoon.

The Decatur Daily Review, Decatur IL, 9 Jul 1926, pg. 13





  MOORE, Jesse Hale   

Jesse Hale Moore, who died at Callao, Peru, was born near Lebanon, St. Clair county, Ill, April 22d, 1817. At the age of 25, he graduated from McKendree college and was soon afterwards married to Miss Rachel H. Hines of Kentucky. For fourteen years he followed the calling of a school teacher, being for some time principal of an English and German academy of Quincy. In 1856 he entered the ministry, and was stationed at Carlinville, Jacksonville and Decatur, commencing his work as pastor of the First M.E. church in this city in September 1861. He was deeply moved by the war of the rebellion and to him loyalty to the country seemed a part of religion. He had not served as pastor in his Decatur charge for a full year before he felt a call to go to the front and do battle for the faith that was in him. He was chosen colonel of the 115th Illinois Volunteers, and was ordered to the front from Camp Butler in October, 1862. His regiment was assigned to the Army of Kentucky. It was engaged under General Sherman and General Thomas. During the year 1865, the last of the war, Col. Moore was breveted Brigadier-General.

A return from the war was to him a return to the ministry. He became presiding elder of the Decatur district of the M. E. church, but he again left the ministry in 1868 to become a candidate for congress. He was successful and was re-elected in 1870. While in congress he might have made himself rich, as many men have done by disreputable means, but he was not that type of a man. He filled his office honestly and laid down his office no richer in purse than he was at the beginning. He afterwards became pension agent, with headquarters at Springfield, but was out of office again in 1877 by the consolidation of the Illinois offices. In 1881, he received the appointment of U. S. consul at Callao, Peru, and sailed for his port on July 2d of that year. He was a man of strong constitution, and would probably have lived twenty years if he had not fallen a victim to yellow fever. General Moore was a man of many good qualities. He had more than ordinary ability. He was energetic, proud in a good sense, able, fluent as a public speaker, gifted with insight and good management, and honest in public as well as private life. He had a good sense of humor, and knew how to impart to others lives the sunshine of that happiness which filled his own.

The living members of his family are his widow, his sons Harry and Charles, who are now stationed at Callao, two daughters Mrs. Alice McC?mas and Miss Helen Moore of Albuquerque N.M., two sons Edward Moore of Topeka, Kas, and James F. Moore of Carrollton Ill, and a daughter, Mrs. Geo R. Steele of Decatur, the only child of the general now residing here. They are all well known in Decatur, and they all have the sincerest sympathy of our people in their sorrow.

Gen. Moore’s body finds its last resting place in foreign soil, but from his grave the mystic chords of memory reach out to many a living heart, and when touched even after years have passed they will still tell us that a gentle and useful spirit left the earth when Death summoned Jesse H. Moore.

The Saturday Herald, Decatur IL, 21 July 1883

NOTE: A multi-column description of a community memorial service attended by 2000 people at Imboden’s Springs was published in the Decatur Weekly Republican, Decatur Illinois, 2 Aug 1883. According to an article published in the Decatur Weekly Republican, 13 Dec 1883, the Secretary of State ordered the body of Mr. Moore to be exhumed in Peru and buried in the Greenwood Cemetery in Decatur Illinois, at the family’s request.





  MOOMEY, Louis S.

Louis S. Moomey died at 7 o'clock Friday evening at the family residence 1637 North Clinton street. He has been ill with a complication of diseases for eleven weeks. He was about forty-three years old. He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Martha Moomey, and six children, Mattie, Louis, Bruce, Inez, Lucy and Bernard Moomey, all of Decatur. He is also survived by his mother, three brothers, Charles M. Moomey of Blue Mound, Richard Moomey of Omaha, Neb., and Edward Moomey of Decatur.

The Daily Review (Decatur), 11 Dec 1909





  MOORE, Caroline
FOUND MOTHER DEAD ON FLOOR

Mrs. Caroline Moore Expired Suddenly

Mrs. Caroline Moore, aged seventy-eight years and a life-long resident of Macon county, was found dead at the family residence, six and a half miles soutwest of Decatur, about 10:15 o'clock Saturday night.

After supper her son, Harvey Moore, went to spend the evening at he home of a neighbor, and when they returned Mrs. Moore was found dead on the floor in the kitchen.

Mrs. Moore was born near the Salem cemtery, Nov. 14, 1840. Her father owned much land in that neighborhood and part of the land is now occupied by the Salem cemetery. Mrs. Moore had spent her entire life in Macon county, and was one of the best known women in that neighborhood. Eight children were born to Mrs. Moore, of whom the following six survive her; Harvey Moore, southwest of Decatur; Alvin Moore, and Francis Moore of Decatur; Perry Moore, six miles east of Assumption; Mrs. Charles Elliott and Mrs. Mary Bradshaw, both of Decatur. She also leaves two brothers and two sisters, Alfred Ward and L.J. Ward, living in Missouri; Rebecca Rose of Decatur and Mrs. Harriett Gardner of Taylorville.

Coroner Leon A. Monson held an inquest Sunday evening. The verdict was that death was caused by hemorrhage of the lungs. Arrangements were made to hold the funeral Monday afternoon.

Decatur Review, Decatur, IL, 30 Dec 1918





  MOORE, David Nowlin   

Dr. David Nowlin Moore died at his residence 541 West Main street, Sunday evening, Feb 26, at 9 o’clock, after an illness of thirteen, resulting from peritonitis which did not yield to the best medical skill. Deceased was born March 1, 1827 and consequently lacked but two days of reaching his 66th year. He was an Illinoisan by birth having been born at Waterloo, Monroe county. He was next to the youngest of a family of ten children. His brothers and sisters were James, William McKendree, Nelson, Mrs. Wilson and Mrs. Mary C. Gray, who are dead and Judge Parker Moore of Kansas, Dr. E.W. Moore and Mrs. Dr. Mitchell both of this city.

Dr. Moore was raised on a farm, where he was born, and in 1849, at the age of 22, he became one of the great ????? that went across the plains to California to seek their fortune in the newly discovered gold fields. He met with some success in his venture, saving enough to take him through three courses in medical and surgery at the St. Louis University, from which institution he graduated in 1855. He returned from California in 1853 and took up his residence in Carlyle, Clinton county, where he practiced his profession until he came to Decatur in 1885. He was a skillful physician and was always very popular with his patients and the families in which he practiced, and as a result enjoyed a very large practice up to the time of his death.

Dr. D.N. Moore married Miss Matilda J. Scott of Carlyle who survives him in the fall of 1858, and in them were born four children, Henry, J. McCabe, Lyda and Edith, all of whom save J. McCabe, who is an attorney at Kansas City, Kas. are dead. Henry died at Coriath, Miss, during the war, aged 5 years; Edith died at the age of 13 years; and Lyda Moore Pertar died after her marriage.

When the war broke out, Dr. Moore went into the service as a surgeon remaining over three years and until the war closed. He was first made chief surgeon of the 90th Illinois Infantry, July 25, 1862 to succeed Surgeon William A. Gordon, who was captured at Belmont. Upon the return of Surgeon Gordon, who had been mustered out to date from the day of his capture, the order was revoked and he was remustered March 18, 1863, and Surgeon Moore was mustered out. He was mustered in as surgeon of the 16th Illinois Cavalry, May 1, 1863, and remained in that position until the regiment was consolidated in January 1865. Surgeon Moore also served as medical director at Helena, Ark. and also at Little Rock. Deceased was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church having joined in his youth and rejoined after his return from California. Since residing in Decatur he was a member of Grace Church. He was a prominent Mason and member of the Knights Templar. He also belonged to Dunham Post No. 141, G.A.R. The best tribute that can be given Dr. Moore is to state the fact that he was loved by all who knew him.

He was first taken sick at his office on the evening of the 14th of February with a severe attack of colic which yielded to the ordinary remedies and on the 15th he was again at this office, the trouble recurring again in the evening. The next day he again attended to business, but in the evening had a severe relapse from which he could not rally. He suffered a great deal of pain during his sickness.

The funeral will be from the Presbyterian church Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock, and will be conducted by Rev. James Miller and the masons. The interment will be at Greenwood Cemetery.

Decatur Daily Republican, Decatur IL, 27 Feb 1893

FUNERAL OF DR. MOORE

AN IMPRESSIVE SERMON BY REV. JAMES MILLER

The Services Were Largely Attended - The Music - Ministers There - Character of Dr. Moore - Dr. W.H. Penhallegon Adds a Flower - Services at the Grave

Dr. D.N. Moore's funeral at the Presbyterian church was the largest held in Decatur in a long time. Every seat down stairs and many in the gallery were occupied. The services were unusual too. The two ministers who spoke had but little to say in the line of the ordinary funeral sermon, but referred especially to the noble character of Dr. Moore and held high estimation in which he was held.

On the pulpit platform were seated Rev. T.A. Parker, Rev. James Miller, Rev. H.H. Oneal, Rev. W.H. Penhallegon, and Rev. W.H. Ilsley of Macon. The front of the platform was covered with floral pieces.

The music was furnished by a quartet composed of Mrs. F.E. Bunn, Miss Keeler, Frank Powers and F.E. Bunn. Miss Edna Bunn was at the organ. While the people were assembling she played Batiste's arrangement of "Abide With Me." While they were going out she played "March Funere." During the services the quartet sang "They Are Gathered One By One," "Rock of Ages," by D.Buck, and "Lead Kindly Light," also by D.Buck. All the music was beautifully rendered.

The services were opened by a Scriptural selection read by Rev. H.H. Oneal. Dr. T.A. Parker made the opening prayer. The sermon was preached by Rev. James Miller. It was one of the ablest and most impressive sermons of the many that he has preached in Decatur.

Mr. Miller took for his text Eccl xii, 7: "Then shall the dust return to the earth as it was: and the spirit shall return unto the God who gave it." Man's nature is double. The highest side tends to rise; the body tends toward earth. It is as natural for the soul to seek its source as for th body to seek the earth. The struggle between the earthly and the heavenly born is a natural one. Every one here has felt that struggle. It is natural for the spirit of man to develp, grow, become beautiful and take its departure. It is natural for man to die; it is just as natural for man to live forever. We gather here today to commit to earth that to which earth is entitled, and from which she will not be denied.

At times it seems strange that we should always live. The body grows, becomes strong, beautiful; it walks, it runs, it is a thing of power and strength; then it falls, it is utterly motionless, and in time it is utterly lost in the earth from which it came.

That is the end of his body. How about his soul? "The spirit shall return to the God who gave it." Can it be that this spirit of man again falls back into the ocean of the infinite and loses its individuality? It would seem that the analogy with the physical nature was complete. The body becomes a part of the earth from which it came. But the characteristics of the divine are individuality. If there is a God, it is a God of individuality, of will, of reason. Think what sublime destiny is before man. The spirit of man shall return to the God who gave it. That means that man shall return to God by self energy, self discipline, self unfoldment, self expansion. Shall rise eternally into the image that gave it.

So we come together today in a sad hour. A husband, a father, a great physician, a broad, kind Christian, benevolent man is gone. Gone from our eyes, from the sound of our voice, but not gone. The spirit of our brother has but gone to the God who gave it.

From the time that our brother began his earthly career, that body never paused on its journey to the end to which it has now come. So with his soul. It never stopped on its journey to the God who gave it. When he fought under the flag of his country, when he administered to the suffering, he was still on that journey. When he gave his young, strong mind to the problems of disease and its remedy, he was still journeying on. He was still disciplining his will and making it like the will of the divine, unfolding his nature and gradually back to God.

In all that he did was that true aspiration towards the nature of God. He had a broad, noble and rational faith in God that carried him nearer to the divine.

At last, in the last sickness, he recoginzed that the end of his journey had come. He knew that he should die, but he also knew that he should live. He knew that his body should return to dust, but he knew that the dustless spirit should return to the God who gave it. It may be thought that this was to him an affliction, but it was not. He looked on it with peace and without fear.

To you, my friends, it now night - to him it is morning. To you there is now darkness, sorrow, longing, pain; to him it is day, peace, happiness. Nor is it to him to lose self identity, to lose his personality. By the words of jesus we know that it is not so. "I go to prepare a place for you. If it were not so I would have told you." So my freinds, while we bury the remains of the dear doctor, we do it in the firm assurance that we shall find him in his own personal and loved character beyond the grave, and we know that we shall meet him there. We know that somehow in the exploration of the unknown infinite he will meet those who have gone before, perhaps has met them already. We fancy that through the clouds and mists he was able to see his dear ones.

May our characters be as kind, broad, manly and noble; may our deaths be as peaceful; may oru immotality be as beautiful as his was. May God be kind to you, my friends, may he comfort you, may he sustain you with his loving hands.

Dr. W.H. Penhallegon said he had been requested to supplement this sermon with a few remarks, so he would add but a single flower. When Webster died it was said, "The world will be lonesome without you." So we can say that of our friend. He was a manly man. He was always the same, a faithful friend, a noble man, a man who has rounded out a magnificent character, a man who was loved by all, who was admired by all, and now that he is gone, there is but one expression, "He was a good man." He was a church member, but he was more than that, he was a true Christian. How beautiful the thought, that while we die we yet live. We sorrow today, but yet we can sustain that sorrow with the thought that we shall see him again.

At the grave the Masonic burial service was in charge of Macon lodge No. 8, A.F. & A.M. The Knights Templars attended as an escort. The pallbearers were W.H. Starr, Milton Johnson, A.W. Conklin, Peter Loeb, F.M. Young, Hiram Johnson.

The Daily Review, Decatur, IL, Wednesday, 1 Mar 1893, pg. 1





  MOORE, Dr. E.W.   

Dr. E. W. Moore, one of the oldest practitioners in this part of the state, died last night at the home of his daughter, Mrs. S. BG. Allen, at Cleburne, Texas, where he had been making his home for some months past. The sad news reached Decatur when the following telegram was received this morning;

Cleburne, Texas Mary 20. S. D. May, Decatur Ill:

Dr. E.W. Moore died last night. Leave Sunday morning with remains; will reach Decatur at 11:30 a.m. Monday. S. D. Allen

For some years past Dr. Moore had been in failing health. The winter of 1897 he passed in Texas with his daughter, Mrs. Allen, and in April 1898, he returned to Decatur and visited with his niece, Mrs. S. D. May, until last November. When he left the last time he was very feeble and was partially paralyzed. The news of Dr. Moore’s death will be received with general regret for he was a most exemplary man and one who was liked by all who knew him. He is survived by a sister, Mrs. W.H. Mitchell; one daughter, Mrs. Helen Allen, wife of S.D. Allen of Cleburne Texas; three nieces, Mrs. S.D. May and Mrs. G.M. Wood of Decatur and Mrs. Mollie Shellabarger of Topeka Kansas; also a nephew, Attorney McCabe Moore of Kansas city.

Dr. Moore is the descendant of the earliest American family to settle in Illinois, his father James Moore, having been the first white male child born of American parents within the limits of the state. Dr. Moore’s mother was the daughter of Co. William Whiteside, one of the pioneer settlers of Monroe county.

Dr. Moore was the seventh of a family of ten children and was born near Waterloo, in Monroe county, on December 7, 1821. His boyhood was spent in this native county. He attended school at Waterloo and for a time taught school. In the fall of 1849 he began the study of medicine at Columbia college in Monroe county. He received his medical education in the medical department of the St. Louis university, now known as the St. Louis Medical college. He graduated from this institution in March, 1853. In 1854 he began the practice of his profession at Carlisle, Ill., and became a resident of Decatur in March, 1856. During the war of the rebellion he offered his services to the government and was commissioned a surgeon of the 115th Illinois regiment. His regiment was attached to the army of the Cumberland and during his connection with tit served in Kentucky and Tennessee. After seven months service he resigned on account of ill health and resumed his practice in Decatur.

The deceased was married in October, 1854, to Miss Annie B. Lockwood, a native of Philadelphia and a daughter of the Hon. Daniel C. Lockwood. She was connected with the Com??lus family, one of whose members was Bishop Cammlus of the Protestant Episcopal church, and was a cousin of Gen. Henry K. Lockwood of the United States regular army. Her death occurred in July 1876.

Dr. Moore was originally a Whig and supported Henry Clay in the presidential election of 1844. He voted for Fremont in 1856 and had voted for every Republican presidential candidate from that time to the present. He had been a member of the M. E. church for a number of years.

Dr. Moore was one of the oldest practitioners in Decatur or in this part of the state. Before the war he formed a partnership with Dr. Ira N. Barnes, but when the war broke out the partnership was dissolved and Dr. Moore went to war as surgeon of the 115th Illinois volunteer regiment and Dr. Barnes went as surgeon of the 116th regiment. After the war was over in 1865 Drs. Moore and Barnes again formed a partnership which lasted until a few years ago. For a period of 10 years Dr. D. N. Moore was a partner in the firm, but at his death the partnership was dissolved and Dr. Barnes and Dr. Moore felt that they were too old to again organize. They kept their offices together, however, until about two years ago, when he made his office with Dr. C.M. Wood in the Haworth block. He soon after sold his residence and went to Texas to spend the winter with his daughter. For a period of more than 30 years Drs. Moore and Barnes occupied the same offices in the building at the corner of Water and Main streets.

Dr. Barnes in speaking of the death of the man who was his partner for so many years, said today; "Dr. Moore was a man most rigidly and strictly honest. No one ever doubted his word. He was a strong believer in religion and he always paid the greatest attention to his religions duties. In his younger days he was a very active man. A good many years ago while we were driving north of the city coming from the house of an injured man in the country the horse became frightened and Dr. Moore was thrown from the buggy and his hip fractured. He was always lame on account of the injury and ever afterward walked with a cane. As a physician and a man Dr. Moore was honest. During all the many years that we were associated together as partners we never had a harsh word. Our relations were always pleasant and we had a thorough understanding of each other."

Dr. Moore was a life long Methodist and was a licensed preacher in that church. He officiated at marriages and was often called upon to assist the pastors of the city at the funerals of old residents of the city. He was widely known throughout the county. He was especially fond of children and was tender hearted and kind. He at one time owned a good deal of real estate in Decatur. Much of his money he spent on other people. To several young persons he gave money to secure an education and was always liberal with his money and was ready to give freely to any worthy cause. The fact that Dr. Moore was so closely identified with the early settlement of the county and on account of his many admirable traits of character he was endeared to many persons.

The physicians of the Medical society of Decatur will meet on Sunday forenoon at 10 o’clock at the office of Dr. Ira N. Barnes for the purpose of passing resolutions and making arrangements to attend the funeral.

The Daily Republican, Decatur IL, 20 May 1899, pg. 1





  MOORE, Maudie

Died - At 8 o'clock this morning, Little Maudie, daughter of W.E.B. and Melissa M. Moore. The funeral will take place to-morrow, at 10 A.M., from the residence of M. Glore. Friends of the familiy are invited to attend.

Decatur Review, 5 May 1870





  MOORE, Mrs. Hannah

Mrs. H.M., wife of W.B. Moore died of hemorrhage of bowels at 6 p.m. August 21 at the family residence, 185 West Decatur street, aged 39 years. She leaves a husband and several small children.

Weekly Herald Despatch, 26 August 1893





  MOORE, Samuel W.   

The inquest over the body of Samuel W. Moore, who died as a result of injuries received when a gravel bank caved in on him, was held by coroner Dawson this afternoon at 3 o’clock at the coroner’s office in the court house.

The funeral will be held at 10 a.m. Tuesday from the residence, 862 East Leafland avenue, and the burial will be at Greenwood cemetery.

The Daily Review, Decatur IL, 23 Sep 1901





  MOORE, Viola

On Wednesday evening, July 29, at the residence of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Moore, 458 East Mason st, of consumption, Miss Viola Moore, aged 23 years.

The deceased was a member of the Christian church, a graduate of the High School, and had been confined to her home for nearly a year. Her many classmates and friends will be pained to learn of her premature death, and will offer sympathy to the bereaved parents.

The funeral will take place from the family residence on July 31 at 2 p.m. Rev. Haynes and Rev. Pinkerton officiating.

Decatur Daily Republican, 30 July 1885





  MOOTHART, Andrew

Andrew Moothart, residing near Oreana, died about four o’clock yesterday morning from a sudden attack of cramp colic. Deceased leaves a widow and three children by his first wife. The funeral will take place to-morrow morning from the Union church at eleven o’clock, Elder J.W. Tyler officiating.

The Daily Review, Decatur, IL, 19 Mar 1886

20 Mar 1886

Andrew Moothart died at his residence at three o’clock Thursday morning of lung fever. Funeral on Sunday.

The Daily Review, Decatur, IL, 20 Mar 1886





  MORAN, James J.

James J. Moran Dies Suddenly

Prominent Undertaker Passes Away In Hospital While Under Treatment - Friend of Thousands

James J. Moran, one of the most prominent undertakers in central Illinois, died unexpectedly at 3 o'clock Friday morning at St. Mary's hospital. He was fifty-six years old last October. His death was caused by angina pectoris.

Mr. Moran had been afflicted with heart trouble for some time, but at no time did he or members of his familiy believe that his condition was really serious. A few days ago he complained of gas on his stomach and went to the hospital to have his stomach flushed out. He felt much better afterward and believed that a few treatments of that kind would put him in good shape again.

RETURNS TO HOSPITAL

He returned to the hospital Wednesday and decided to remain there and rest for awhile. He was not confined to his bed, and did not realize that he was near the end of his time. Thursday, a handsome silk house coat was sent to him and he wore it the remainder of the day in his room.

There was nothing in his condition to cause alarm until about ten minutes before his death. Then the attack on his heart came suddenly and he collapsed. He seemed to suffer no pain and passed away as though going to sleep.

WILL BE MISSED

Perhaps no man in Decatur would be more generally missed than "Jimmy," as he was called by the people in all walks of life, by young and old. He was everybody's friend, not in the sense of mere acquaintanceship, but in the sense of being ready at all times to lend a helping hand when he could be of use. That was the secret of his immense popularity. No one ever appealed to him in vain if the appeal was in behalf of a worthy cause. He gave liberally. If in case of a death in a family and his services were asked for he never allowed poverty in the family of the patron to stand in the way. He saved many from the potter's field and buried many for whom he made no charge at all on his books. Others were given their own time in which to pay. His undertaking business was bigger than any other similar business in central Illinois.

KEEN BUSINESS MAN

However, his advance in prosperity was not wholly due to his undertaking business. He was far sighted, and many years ago he took a long time to lease property on the east side of North Water street in the 300 block, where his place of business was located for so long, and the lease also included other properties in that block. The others he rented at a profit.

Later he leased the old C.P. Thatcher place at the northwest corner of Walter and North streets and with James A. Corbett built the Moran-Corbett building, now occupied by the Kinney shoe store and the Empress theater, ect. The rentals on that building paid for it in about five or six years.

PROMINENT CATHOLIC

Mr. Moran was a consistent member of St. Patrick's Catholic church. He was also a member of the Knights of Columbus, Decatur Lodge No. 401, B.P.O. Elks, the Moose Lodge, Decatur aerio of Eagles, Easterly camp No. 1626, Modern Woodmen of America, the Decatur club and the Country club.

Although a member of so many organziations and always ready to assist in any enterprise they might undertake, he was too busy to attend lodge meetings and only once in a great while did he did so. If financial assistance was needed he never shirked. It was not a question of "When must you have it?" but "How much do you want?" and it was paid then and there.

FRIEND OF POOR

He was a friend to the poor, always, yet the most prosperous were always glad to claim him also as a friend. Perhaps no other man in Decatur had so many friends in so many different walks of life. Few persons who had known him for any length of time did not feel indebted to him for some favor shown.

Mr. Moran had not been in robust health for several months. At first he had trouble with his teeth. He had them removed and for quite awhile he seemed in much better health. His jovial good nature never failed and he did not complain.

TO CALIFORNIA

A few weeks ago he took his wife and younger children for a trip to California, just to get away from business for awhile and to rest up. They attended the big picnic of former Decatur people in Los Angeles and met hundreds of their old friends there. Shortly after the picnic they started back home, arriving several days ago.

If he was worried over his physical condition when he started back he never let the fact be known to his family. and it is believed that he had no premonition of death. He had taken frequent trips, but never would stay away from home very long. He always wanted to be near his family. No man ever took a greater interest in his family than did Mr. Moran.

NEVER SOUGHT OFFICE

Mr. Moran never sought office for himself, but he was a political power that had to be contended with if he decided to interest himself in a campaign. In normal times the candidate who had Mr. Moran on his side could feel reasonably sure of success locally.

Beside his wife and children, Mr. Moran leaves four brothers and a sister, Richard Moran, Mark F. Morgan, Thomas A. Moran, Albert R. Moran and MRs. Joe Lengsfelt. He also leaves his step-mother, Mrs. Anna Moran, and three half-sisters, Mrs. Chest Uhles, Mrs. Helen Penny and Miss Pearl Moran, all of Decatur.

CAME HERE IN 1880

Started As Miner, Then Grocer, Later in Undertaking Business

Mr. Moran was born in October, 1869, at Treverton, Pa. His parents were Mr. and Mrs. Mark Moran. They moved to Decatur in 1880. The father, Mark Moran, was a mining superintendent and came to take charge of No. 1 mine. He sunk the No. 2 shaft in Decatur.

James J. Moran received his education in the city schools of Decatur. He worked in the mines when a boy, and later he went into the grocery business with his father. When he quit the grocery business he went to work for the Wikoff and Reeve undertaking establishment. Some time late Mr. Wikoff bought out Mr. Reeve and Mr. Moran secured a half interest. Later he purchased the interest of Mr. Wikoff.

MARRIED IN 1891

Mr. Moran was married on Sept. 16, 1891, to Miss Kate Leahy. They were the parents of five children, Louis, Linus, Ambrose, Imelda and James, Jr. Linus died in 1918. It was in memory of him that the figure 101 was placed on the new Moran building at 218 North Water street. Linus had belonged to a club called "The 101" when he was a student at the St. Francis college at Quincy, and he was much attached to it. After his death, his parents often received letters from other members of the club, with the annotation "101" below their names.

MADE FRIENDS

A keen business foresight and the ability not only to make friends but to keep them gave Mr. Moran the preminent place he held in the business life of Decatur. He numbered his friends and acquaintances by the thousands. His business prospered from the first. Always he was up to date in his business methods. His establishment always had the latest in equipment and service.

SONS IN BUSINESS

His sons, Louis A. and Ambrose C., were taken in as members of the firm on Jan. 1, 1921. As a surprise to them Mr. Moran had the fact announced through the newspapers before he ever told them that they were to be made members of the firm. Since then the firm has been known as James J. Moran & Sons, undertakers. The two young men had taken an active interest in the business for a long time, and the father decided to give them third interests in the business as their reward while he was still alive, rather than wait until after his death.

OPENED FUNERAL HOME

The popularity of Mr. Moran was attested at the time he opened his new funeral home at Water and Eldorado streets in November, 1924. The scores of gifts, of flowers, the telegrams of congratulation, the visits of thousands who left their greetings in person, showed the high esteem in which he was held. Messages with compliments came from all over the country.

BEAUTIFUL PLACE

His beautiful new funeral home at Water and Eldorado is one of the finest to be found in the country. It embodies all the latest ideas in funeral establishments. It was erected at a cost of $150,000. It was the fulfillment of a dream he had had for twenty years. All through these years he had been laying aside money for that building, and when at last the building arose Mr. Moran was able to say "It's all paid for." In explanation he said:

"I wanted to give the poor man a home where he could have the same sort of funeral as the rich man."

ACTIVE IN ILLINOIS

Mr. Moran was active in the Illinois Undertakers association, and had been named as delegate from the state body to the national association metting, at different times.

In 1923, the Morans bought the Dr. George W. Weyl home at 235 Park Place, and since then that has been the family home.

WIDE INTEREST

Death is Subject of Discussion On Streets

Everywhere throughout the business section Friday morning, the death of J.J. Moran was a subject of conversation and expressions of regret were heard on every hand. Every one had a good word to say as he recalled some personal act of kindness either to himself or that came under his notice. The Review received scores of telephone calls.

Representatives of casket and burial supply houses throughout the country knew Mr. Moran and all esteemed him as a friend. J.A. Conrad and J.F. McEvoy, both traveling representatives of manufacturers of burial goods, were in Decatur Friday morning and both expressed surprise and sorrow on learning of the death of Mr. Moran. Both delcared that no other man in the state occupied a higher place in the estimation of those engaged in similar business than did Mr. Moran, and all members of the Illinois Undertakers association, manufacturers and salesmen all looked upon him as a personal and dear friend.

PAYS TRIBUTE

Rev. R.E. Henry said of Mr. Moran, Friday morning:

"I have known J.J. Moran for the last fifteen years and during the past ten years have conducted more than five hundred funerals with him. In all my intimate acquaintance with him he has been a gentleman, courteous, kind and considerate.

"Many times the funeral was of someone unable to pay for the service rendered and to my knowledge Mr. Moran not only made no charge himself, but paid for the grave and other expenses out of his own pocket. One such instance was of a father and five babies within the space of six years for which no charge was made.

"He was one of my closest friends, and I shall miss him like I would my own brother. He died as he wished to go, in the very midst of his business and without days of suffering."

FUNERAL MONDAY

The funeral will be held at 10 o'clock Monday morning at St. Patrick's Catholic church and will be directed by Leon A. Monson. The burial will be in Calvary cemtery. Space will be reserved in the church for visiting undertakers and manufacturers.

Decatur Daily Review, 19 Mar 1926





  MORAN, Samuel   

R. E. Moran, engineer for the Decatur Railway and Light company, received word Saturday afternoon of the death of his father, Samuel Moran, at the National Soldiers’ Home in Washington D.C. His death occurred at 6:30 Friday evening. He had been in Washington only about thirty days. A son, C. J. Moran, was with him at the time of his death, and will bring the body to Decatur, arriving here this evening. Arrangements will not be made for the funeral until after the arrival of the body.

Mr. Moran was seventy-three years old. He was born in Marion county W. VA. At the beginning of the civil war he enlisted in Company F of the Twelfth West Virginia Volunteer infantry and served throughout the war. At the close of the war he engaged in farming for awhile and was later engaged in the general contracting business. The family moved to Decatur about thirty years ago. Mr. Moran led a quiet, retired life after moving to this city.

He is survived by three sons, O. J. Moran of Washington D. C., R. E. Moran and Melrose Moran of Decatur. He also leaves the following brothers and sisters: F.P. Moran and E.E. Moran, who live in Nebraska, Z.R. Moran of North Dakota, Mrs. T.E. Reed of Washington state, Mrs. Henry Swisher of West Virginia, and Mrs. Addie Lake of Nebraska.

The body of Samuel Moran will arrive from Washington at 6:30 this evening and will be taken directly to the home of his sons on East Lawrence street.

Decatur Review, Decatur IL, 29 Jun 1913, pg. 19





  MOREHEAD, Margaret (Maleska)
    Born: in Decatur, Macon Co, IL
    Died: 15 Aug 1983 in Chicago, IL
    Buried: Memorial Park
    Parents:
    Married:
    Children:




  MORENZ, Gottlieba Carolina

Gottlieba Caroline, infant daughter of Mr and Mrs Fred Morenz, died Monday night at 8 o'clock at her parents home, 1020 Railroad avenue. She was 6 months old.

The funeral will be held this afternoon at the residence. Rev. W. Lessman will conduct the services. The burial will be at Greenwood Cemetery.

Daily Review (Decatur), 10 August 1892





  MORENZ, Hugo Otto

Hugo Otto Morenz, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Otto Morenz, died at 5 o'clock Monday morning at the family residence, 1429 East Herkimer street. He was three days old. The funeral will be held at 2 o'clock Tuesday afternoon, conducted by Rev. William Heyne.

Decatur Review, 9 Aug 1909





  MOREY, Lura Gladys

Lura Gladys Morey, 83, formerly of Decatur, Macon Co., IL, died Sunday, October 24, 1976 in Mesa, Arizona. A member of the Mesa 3rd Ward, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, she came to Arizona seven years ago from Illinois. She had lived at 921 E. Mueller Ave. for many years. Survivors include her daughter, Hazel Below of Mesa; grand children, Helen Estes and Robert Morey, Mesa; Janet Carpenter, Boody,IL and Ron Morey, LaFayette, TN., 23 great grand children and seven great-great grandchildren. Funeral services will be at 2 pm Wednesday, Gibbons-Bunker Garden Chapel, 33 N. Sirrine. Interment will be in Mountain View Memorial Gardens, Maricopa County, Arizona.

Submitted by: Helen in Texas





  MORGAN, Ida Lavina
    Born:
    Died: 27 Jan, 1954 in Decatur, Macon Co, IL
    Buried:
    Parents:
    Married:
    Children:




  MORGAN, Eliza Jane PATE
    Born: Born: 1842 Christian Co IL
    Died: 20 April 1905 in Decatur, Macon Co, IL
    Buried: Greenwood Cem, Decatur, IL
    Parents: William Riley & Eliza Jane DAVIS PATE
    Married: Samuel Morgan 16 Feb 1858, Christian Co IL
    Children: Mary Francis, William Jasper, Etta Palmvra, Martha Ellen, Alta Belle, Ida Lavina, Ada Lavada, Lucy Lacore, Charles Edward, & Arlie Ray




  MORGAN, Horace

MR. HORACE MORGAN SR., DIES SUDDENLY AT HIS HOME ON EAST NORTH STREET

Horace Morgan, Sr., died very suddenly and unexpectedly at half past eleven o'clock last night, at his home on East North St. The cause of his death was paralysis. On Christmas day he and his wife were uptown and dined with their son, Albert. Yesterday morning he was not feeling very well, but in the afternoon put on his overcoat and would have gone uptown had his family not restrained him. He spent an hour outdoors and last evening ate a moderately hearty supper. About 6 o'clock he retired and dropped into a peaceful sleep, from which he never awoke, at half past eleven passing into the valley of the shadow of death.

The deceased was born in Windom (sic) County, Connecticut, April 5, 1813, and removed to Illinois in 1839. He settled at Old Stonington and lived there until March 4, 1849 when he moved to Springfield. He resided at the capital for 33 years and then moved to Decatur, where he has since lived. While at Springfield, he served for 4 years as city marshal and for a number of years was a member of the state house police force. On January 4, 1836, he was married at Plainfield, Windom County, to Mary Ann Butler who now survives him. Preparations had been made to celebrate their golden wedding aniversary next week. Mr. Morgan was the father of 9 children, seven of whom are now living. They are Horace, Walter, Albert, and George Morgan, Mrs. Charles Taylor, and Mrs. A. E. Kinney. (only 6 are listed) They all live in Decatur except George who lives in St. Louis and Walter who lives in Litchfield.

Mr. Morgan was 72 years old at the time of his death and was a remarkably well preserved and active man for one of his years. His health began failing last spring and in April he tried to benefit himself by a trip to Hot Springs. He was of a bright and cheerful disposition and always met his friends with a cheering smile and word and a hearty hand grasp. He will be sadly missed from this community where he had many friends and was generally esteemed. No arrangements have yet been made regarding the funeral, but the body will be taken to Springfield for interment.

Decatur Daily Review, December 27, 1885, page 3





  MORGAN, Mercy A.

DEATH OF MRS. M. A. MORGAN - INCIDENT CONNECTED WITH HER HUSBANDS DEATH RECALLED

Mercy A. Morgan, widow of the late Captain Horace Morgan, died last evening at 4 o'clock at her home, 433 North Water St., aged 92 years, 5 months, and 4 days. Deceased has been in delicate health for several years, but was not an invalid and the sickness which caused her death has been of 6 days duration.

Mrs. Morgan was born in Plainfield , Windham (sic) County, Conn., Sept 13, 1812. Her maiden name was Mercy Ann Button (sic). In 1836 she was married to Horace Morgan. They came west in 1839 and settled at Old Stonington. In 1849 they moved to Springfield and in 1882 to Decatur.

Captain Horace Morgan died Dec. 26, 1885. Mr and Mrs. Morgan had made all arrangements to celebrate their golden wedding. The cards were printed and a week before the celebration was to take place, Mr. Morgan died. The wedding cards and the death notices were sent out at the same time.

Mrs. Morgan has been a member of the Baptist church since early childhood. She was always of a sociable, generous nature and up to the hour of her death knew everything and realized that death was near. She leaves one sister, Mrs. Rev. P. Pray of Taylorville, and 5 children: Horace A., A. S., and George K. Morgan of Decatur, Mrs. C. A. Taylor of Lexington, Mo., and A. E. Kinney of Decatur.

The arrangements for the funeral have not been made. The family own a lot in Oak ridge cemetery at Springfield and the burial will be there. The funeral services will be held in Decatur.

Decatur Daily Review, Mar 5, 1893, p 9





  MORGAN, Samuel   
    Born: 1816/1818
    Died: 24 June, 1892 in Decatur, Macon Co, IL
    Buried: Greenwood Cem, Decatur, IL
    Parents: Lambert & Nancy (Lindsey) MORGAN
    Married: Eliza Pate
    Children: Mary Francis, William Jasper, Etta Palmyra, Martha Ellen, Alta Belle, Ida Lavina, Ada Lavada, Lucy Lacore, Charles Edward, & Arlie Ray

Died on North Edward street, on June 24, Samuel Morgan, aged 70 years. The deceased was a veteran of the late war and was afflicted with rheumatism of the heart. He served in the 63rd Illinois Regiment. The funeral took place this afternoon. Rev. C.E. Torrey officiating.

Decatur Daily Republican, Decatur IL, 25 Jun 1892

The funeral of Samuel Morgan was held yesterday afternoon at 2 o'clock at his late residence on North Edward street. The sermon was preached by Rev. C.E. Torrey of the First Baptist church. Mr. Morgan was a member of company H of the sixty-third Illinois infantry. The pall bearers were from among the members of the G.A.R. The body was buried in the soldier's lots at Greenwood.

Daily Review (Decatur), 26 June 1892





  MORRIS, George W.   

George W. Morris, ?07 North Monroe, died Sunday night at 11 o’clock, the cause being Bright’s disease. He was 60 years of age, and was a contacting elevator millwright. He was born in Philadelphia, Oct. 16, 1850.

He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Alice Morris, four daughters, Mrs. H. L. Hoffman, Mrs. J. H. Seibert, Mrs. W. O. Leedy, and Miss Florence Morris. He is also survived by one son, George E. Morris. Two brothers, William A. Morris, and James Morris, and two sisters, Mrs. W.W. Glessner, and Mrs. Emma Harris and his stepmother, Mrs. Mary whitehead also survive him.

The funeral arrangements have not yet been completed.

The Daily Review, Decatur IL, 24 Oct 1910, pg. 10

NOTE: According to an article in the 26 Oct 1910 The Daily Review, funeral services for Mr. Morris were held at the residence at 707 North Monroe. The interment was in Greenwood.





  MORRIS, Lewis   

Lewis Morris died of asthma at his home in Mt. Zion Township on Tuesday evening, aged 45 years. He was a son of the late T.H. Morris of Decatur. He leaves a wife and nine children. He served during the war in Co. A. 116th Ill. Inf. The funeral services will be held at the Salem church at 11 o'clock today. Rev. Bankson officiating.

Decatur Daily Review, 26 Apr 1888

Submitted by: Michele Nelson

Died April 24, 1888, Lewis Morris, in Mt. Zion township of lung affection or cancer of the throat.

The subject of the above notice was born in Piqua county, Ohio, February 6, 1824, and came with his father’s family to Illinois in the year 1838. On the 4th day of July 1844, he was married to Lida Huffman, and in the spring of 1850 he, like many others, went to California in search of the precious metal and remained there two y ears, after which time he returned home and improved his land near where C. Morris, his brother, is now living. In the year 1862, on the 6th day of August, he enlisted in Company A, 116th Regt. Ill. Vols., for three years, or during the war and remained with his regiment until May 19, 1863 while on duty in rear of Vicksburg he was wounded and sent back to the hospital at Memphis, Tenn. After remaining there for a while he was sent to Benton Barracks, St. Louis, Mo., and afterward transferred from there to the Invalid Corps at Quincy, Ill., where he remained until the 27th day of August 1864, when he was discharged on account of wounds and failing health. Since that time he has been a great sufferer at times and through all of the years since then failing health has remained with both him and his family, and life’s duties with him were gradually but certainly winding to a close. Mr. Morris was a quiet citizen, and served in some of the township’s offices at different times, was always faithful in duty in office, and in all relations of life he was a kind and obliging neighbor, and affectionate husband and father, and when his last moment came he was still a fearless soldier – he met death calmly, expressing an earnest desire to retire to his final rest. He was laid to rest by the G.A.R. Post of Mt. Zion in Salem cemetery, Macon county, Ill on the 26th day of April 1888.

Decatur Daily Republican, Decatur IL, 1 May 1888





  MORRIS, Lewis Mrs.

Died of Paralysis - Mrs. Lewis Morris died of paralysis on Thursday, May 7, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. A.C. Chenoweth on East Marietta Street. The deceased was 65 years old. She was visiting her daughter on Tuesday when she was siezed with the sickness which caused her death. The home of Mrs. Morris was in South Wheatland. The funeral will occur on Sunday forenoon. The services will be conducted by Rev. W.L. Bankson at 11o'clock at the Salem church.

Decatur Daily Review 5/8/1891

Submitted by: Michele Nelson





  MORRIS, Thomas H.   

Morris - On Thursday, Oct. 27, 1881, at his home on East William street, in this city, Thomas H. Morris, nearly 86 years. The deceased was born in the state of Maryland, Dec. 1, 1795. At an early age he removed with his parents to Ohio. He was a soldier in the war of 1812. He was married four times; first to Nancy Wolverton, March 24, 1814; to Nancy Lynch, Sept. 3rd, 1832; to Susan Greenfield, Dec. 10, 1854; to Nancy Fletcher, Sept. 27, 1863; the latter surviving him. He came to this county from Ohio in 1837, and settled on the farm where Isaac Boardman now lives. He came to Decatur in 1859, and has ever since been a resident of the city. He leaves seven children, five sons and two dalughters, six of whom were present at his death. The oldest, Mark Morris, lives in Oregon. He leaves forty one grand children living and forty-five great grandchildren. In 1873 he was seriously injured by the cars on the I.C. railroad, since which time he has been an invalid. He was a pensioner of the war of 1812. The funeral services will take place at Walnut Grove school house, south of this city, on Saturday Oct. 29 at 1 o'clock. His body will be buried at Walnut Grove cemetary.

Submitted by: Michele Nelson

DEATH OF AN OLD CITIZEN

In our issue of yesterday allusion was made to the death of one of Decatur's and Macon county's old time settlers, Thomas H. Morris.

Mr. Morris was born in Maryland, December 1, 1795, and departed this life after a long and varied pilgrimage, at his residence on East William street, this city, Oct. 27, 1881, consequently he was nearly 86 years of age. He removed from the state of Maryland when a small boy, and became a resident of Pickaway county, Ohio, whence have come so many of our older citizens. Either in the last named state, of in Indiana, he enlisted while yet a mere lad, in the war of 1812, as a member of infantry under Capt. McNamara. He was fortunate enough to escape unscathed from the dangers of his soldier experience, and removed to Macon county, Illinois, in the year 1838, and settled where Capt. Boardman, one of Macon county's pioneers, now resides, in Wheatland township, about three miles southeast of Decatur.

On March 24th, 1814, Mr. Morris was married in Ohio, or Indiana, to Nancy Wolverton. After her death, he was, on the 3d day of September, 1832, married to Nancy Lynch. His third wife was Susan Greenfield, to whom he was united in marriage December 10th, 1854. His fourth wife, with whom he formed a matrimonial alliance on the 27th of Septbember, 1863, and who now survives him, was Nancy Fletcher. Mr. Morris leaves seven surviving children, five boys and two girls, all adults, to mourn his departure, the oldest of whom is Mark Morris, now residing in Oregon. The next oldest is Sarah Agen, now a resident of this city. The third member of the family is Lewis Morris, now living in Mt. Zion township, this county. Cornelius Morris, residing in Wheatland township, is his fourth child. John Morris, now living in Decatur, is his fifth child. Jane Kendall, wife of Mr. Oliver Kendall of Mt. Zion township, is his sixth child, and the youngest member of the family is Douglas Morris, residing in Decatur.

He leaves 41 grand children and forty five great grand children.

The burial will take place at the Walnut Grove school house cemetery, four miles south of Decatur, the funeral services to be held at the above named school house on Saturday, the 29th inst., at one o'clock.

Mr. Morris has been a man of great means, having given to each of his five sons upon reaching their majority, 80 acres of good farming land, and to each of his two daughters considerable money and real estate. He was a peculiar man in many respects, possessing a remarkable strong constitution, inured to all the hardships of pioneer life; was energetic, acquisitive, persistent in what he believed to be right, a man of iron will and a determination that was almost phenominal. He possessed in short those qualities in an eminent degree characterizing the brave and hardy pioneers of our own county and state.

The members of the family will ahve the earnest sympathy of our citizens.

Decatur Daily Republican, 28 Oct 1881





  MORTHLAND, Martha (McClintock)
DEATH ENDS 52 YEARS IN TOWN

Mrs. Martha Morthland Was 81 Years Old

Mrs. Martha Morthland died at 7 o'clock Sunday morning at the family residence, 1128 West Eldorado street. Her health was due to bronchial trouble and the infirmaties incident to old age. She had been in poor health for some time.

Mrs. Morthland was eighty-one years old last month. She had lived in Decatur for fifty-two years and was widely known, espeically among the old settlers. Her husband, Robert Morthland, died in Decatur several years ago. Mrs. Morthland's maiden name was Martha McClintock. She was born Nov. 13, 1828, in Perry county, Pa., and there she was married to Robert Morthland in 1855. In 1857 they moved to Decatur, and this has been her home ever since.

THREE CHILDREN

Mrs. Morthland is survived by three children, John and Warren Morthland, both of Decatur, and Mrs. Charles Gring of Harristown. She also leaves one brother and two sisters, Frank McClintock of Carlyle Springs, Pa., Mrs. Mary Seitz of Sterrett's Gap, Pa., and Mrs. Margaret Mayall of Warrensburg, this county.

The funeral will be held at 1:30 Tuesday afternoon from the residence of her son, John Morthland, 1112 West Eldorado street. The interment will be at Sharon cemetery.

The Decatur Review, Decatur, IL, Monday, Dec 13, 1909





  MORVILLE, Opal Fern (Stuart)
    Born: 9 Mar 1904 in Argenta, Macon Co, IL
    Died: 28 May 1983 in Decatur, Macon Co, IL
    Buried: Fairlawn Cem, Decatur, Macon Co, IL
    Parents: Frank Edward & Nellie Bertha (Reed) Stuart
    Married: 8 Aug 1922 in Corwith, Hancock Co, IA to Roy Francis Morville
    Children: Frances, Beverly, Roy, June, Warren, Donald & Sandra




  MORVILLE, Roy Francis, Sr.
    Born: 30 Sep 1902 in Cerro Gordo, Piatt Co, IL
    Died: 9 Feb 1988 in Decatur, Macon Co, IL
    Buried: Fairlawn Cem, Decatur, Macon Co, IL
    Parents: Arthur & Nora (Jay) Morville
    Married: 8 Aug 1922 in Corwith, Hancock Co, Iowa to Opal Fern Stuart
    Children: Frances, Beverly, Roy, June, Warren, Donald, Sandra




  MOSSER, Joseph

Mr. J.R. Mosser, of the Republican, on yesterday received the sad intelligence of the death of his venerable father, Rev. Joseph Mosser, of Salem, Illinois, which occurred yesterday morning. The deceased was seventy-five years of age and has been suffering for some months with a heart affliction and dropsical complication. The remains of the deceased will be brought to Decatur for interment, but the time of the funeral has not been set.

Daily Review, Decatur, IL, 11 Jun 1886





  MOWRY, George W.   

George W. Mowry died Thursday night at 10 o’clock at his home near Casner, aged 63 years. He was born in Highland county, O., and leaves a wife and four children. The children are Joseph Mowry of Iowa, Ardilla Shumate, Jannie Jolly and Edward Mowry of Casner. Mr. Mowry joined the U. B. church in 1853 and was an earnest and faithful Christian till death.

The funeral will be held from Casner chapel at 11 o’clock Sunday morning. Rev. B. L. Giffins will conduct the services. The body will be buried in Long Creek.

The Daily Review, Decatur IL, 24 Dec 1892, pg. 3





  MOWRY, James H.
RETIRED CASNER FARMER IS DEAD

James H. Mowry Expires While Visiting Son

James Harvey Mowry, retired farmer of Casner, died at 7 o'clock Friday morning at the home of his son, E.A. Mowry, 916 North Jordan street. He was eighty-three years old last August. His death was caused by bladder trouble. He came to Decatur a few weeks ago to visit his son and became ill.

Mr. Mowry was born in Mowrytown, O., Aug. 1, 1844. His wife was formerly Miss Sabina Surber. She died in November, 1906. They came to Illinois and for the last forty-two years the family home has been near Casner. He was a member of the United Brethren church at Casner. He is survived by the following children: E.A. Mowry, Mrs. Etta McCool, L.E. Mowry and A.R. Mowry, all of Decatur, and Henry C. Mowry of Findlay, Ill. There are fifteen grandchildren and sixteen great grandchildren. The body was taken to Dawon & Wikoff funeral directos, and prepared for burial.

Short services will be held at the Dawson & Wikoff chapel at 1:30 o'clock Sunday afternoon. At 2:30 services will be held in the United Brethren church at Casner. The burial will be in Long Creek cemetery.

Decatur Review, Decatur IL, 2 Sep 1927





  MOWRY, Henry C.
H.C. MOWRY DIES AT HIS FORSYTH HOME

Worked in Mills, Fought in War, and Dealt in Corn

Henry C. Mowry, one of the prominent citizens of Macon county, died Monday evening at his home in Forsyth aged 73 years.

WORKED IN COTTON MILLS

Mr. Mowry was born in Smithfield, R.I., March 1, 1835, in the same house in which his father and three generations before him were born. Henry C. Mowry was only 7 years old when his father died and then he found employment in the cotton mills of his native state.

He received only 75 cents a week during the early part of his service, but he was a faithful worker and learned the business so thoroughly that when only 16 years old he was appointed overseer of the Smithfield mills and had from thirty to sixty employes under him. Later he took a position as clerk in a clothing store and still later in a lumber yard. He was working in the lumber yard when the Civil war broke out.

FOUGHT UNDER BURNSIDE

He enlisted Aug. 17, 1861, and was made sergeant of company K, First Rhode Island infantry, a part of the first regiment of which Burnside had charge, and the first that entered Washington. Mr. Mowry fought at Bull Run, Roanoke, Newbury and Fredericksburg. He was slightly wounded in the left leg by a spent ball. When in 1862 he recieved his final discharge he wa acting as lieutenant, but was never commissioned to that office.

Returning to Smithfield, mr. Mowry became a mail agent on the Providence & Worcester railroad, a position to till 1867, when he came to Macon county and located at Forsyth.

IN CENTRAL ILLINOIS

There he built an elevator and cribs and opened a grain office. In 1869 he went to Mattoon and engaged in the same business for the firm of Day, Sprague & Co. of Providence, R.I., having entire charge of their western department. In 1878 he moved his headquarters to Decatur, but later in that same year he returned to Forsyth and made that his home. He was married to Miss Henrietta Flood Aug. 22, 1872.

Ambition and energy were characteristics of the man throughout his entire life. When a boy he paid for his own education at the East Greenwich academy. When only 23 years old he was elected a member of the state legislature in Rhode Island. Politically he was a Democrat. He served several terms as commissioner in Hickory Point township.

MEMBER OF SOCIETIES

He became a Mason in 1865, and later joined the Odd Fellows, Knits of Phthias and the G.A.R. His public and private life was above reproach and he was honored throughout the county. He has served as secretary of the Illinois Grain Dealers' association and was well known to grain men all over the state.

Mr. Mowry had been in poor health since Thanksgiving day. He is survived by his wife and one son, Dr. Albert Mowry, of Chicago and a granddaughter.

The Daily Review, Decatur, IL, 11 Feb 1908





  MOYER, Orville George   

MOYER MEMORIAL IN BEMENT CHURCH

Memorial services for Orville George Moyer, who was killed in Flanders, will be conducted in the Methodist church at 1:15 o'clock, Thursday afternoon, by Rev. Wilbert Dowson, the pastor.

Orville Moyer is a son of Mrs. Mary Wilkerson of Decatur, and was born in Columbus, Ind., Nov. 7, 1896. While he was a small child his parents came to Illinois, and for a few years lived near Bement. When he was 16 years old he enlisted in the United States army, and served 18 months in the Philippines; in the summer of 1916 he worked on a farm near Hammond until August, when he went to Canada and enlisted in the Sixty-third depot battery at Amherstberg, Ontatio. He sailed for England Sept. 29, 1916, and by Christmas time he was in France.

Without having been wounded before he was killed in Flanders, Nov. 3, 1917, four days before he attained his majority; he was buried with military honors in a Belgium cemetery, near Ypres.

He was a member of the Modern Woodmen of American at Hammond. The camp expects to attend the memorial service and participate in the decoration of the monument which has been erected in his memory in Bement cemetery.

Mrs. Mary Wilkerson, the mother of Orville Moyer, is a sister of Orville Daugherty, who lives on an Allentown farm about six miles southwest of Bement.

Decatur Review, 29 May 1918





  MULLIN, Harold

The funeral of Harold, the little son of Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Mullin, took place yesterday afternoon from Jane’s chapel and was well attended by friends of the family. Rev. U.B. Warrington conducted the services.

The Daily Review, Decatur, IL, 19 Mar 1886





  MULLINIX, Vivian Ilene (Beaman) PISELL
AN OLD RESIDENT

Of Macon County Passed Away Yesterday

MRS. M.J. MUIRHEAD DEAD

She was Born in Blue Mound Township and Had Lived in the County 65 Years - Burial on Wednesday

Mrs. Margaret J. Muirhead, widow of the late W.F. Muirhead, died yesterday afternoon at her home in Blue Mound township. She was nearly 65 years old and having lived in this county all her life she was widely known among the old settlers.

Mrs. Muirhead was taken ill of the grip during last December. Since January 3rd she has been confined to her bed and her health had gradually been failing. The immediate cause of her death was stomach trouble.

Margaret Hill was born in Blue Mound township, March 4, 1833, and was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. F.J. Hill. On September 19, 1850, she was married to W.F. Muirhead, who died about a year ago. Shortly after thie marriage Mr. and Mrs. Muirhead went to Missouri, where they resided until 1863 and then returned to Blue Mound townshiop in this county and resided there since. The deceased was a member of the Bethlehem Cumberland Presbyterian church and was a good and Christian woman. She is survived by eight children. They are Mrs. Mary J. Miller of Elwin; Mrs. Anna Ledbetter of Greencastle, INd.; J.F. Muirhead of Harristown; Louis E. and Charles H. Muirhead of Decatur; Silas B. Muirhead of St. Louis, and Albert E. Muirhead and Mrs. Lina Bellmar, both of the home place. Mrs. Muirhead was also survived by two brothers, R.H. Hill of Edgar, Neb., and J.E. Hill of Boody, and also one sister, Mrs. Hannah Widick of Greenfield, Mo.

The funeral will be held on Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock from the family residence. The burial will be at the Pasley cemetery.

Decatur Republican, 1 Mar 1898

The funeral of Mrs. Margaret Muirhead was held this forenoon at 10 o'clock from the family residence in Blue Mound township. The burial was at the Pasley cemetery.

Decatur Republican, 2 Mar 1898





  MULLINIX, Vivian Ilene (Beaman) PISELL
    Born: 28 May 1924 in Decatur, Macon Co, IL
    Died: 16 Aug 1997 in Dahlonega, GA
    Buried: Greenlawn Cem, Roswell, GA
    Parents: Rollie Edward & Lida Fern (Reed) Beaman
    Married: 25 Dec 1946 to Kenneth Louis Pisell
    Married: 7 May 1955 to James Bray Mullinix
    Children: First marriage Kenneth, Terry
    Children Second mariage Brian




  MULLINIX, James Bray
    Born: 19 Apr 1925 in Red Boiling Springs, TN
    Died: 15 Jun 1997 in Decatur, Macon Co, IL
    Buried:
    Parents: Lee & Alta (Borden) Mullinix
    Married: 07 May 1955 to Vivian Ilene Beaman
    Children: Brian




  MULLINS, Clement

Clem Mullins died this morning at half past twelve o’clock, at his residence on South Main street, over May’s grocery store. The deceased was sixty-five years old, and has lived in Decatur for twenty years past. The cause of his death was erysipelas, with which he has been suffering for a period of five weeks. The deceased leaves a wife and six children, all grown but one.

The Daily Review, Decatur, IL, 26 Mar 1886

The funeral of Clement Mullins will take place from Jane’s chapel at three o’clock this afternoon, Rev. J. R. Locke conducting the services. The remains will be interred at Greenwood cemetery.

The Daily Review, Decatur, IL, 27 Mar 1886





  MUNSON, James T.   

James T. Munson died at 11:30 o’clock Thursday night at the residence of his daughter, Mrs. L.E. Crapp, 1732 East Prairie avenue. He was eighty years old last September. His death was caused by euremic poisoning after an illness of six days.

Mr. Munson was born in New Jersey Sept. 24, 1844. He had been a resident of Illinois for many years and during the Civil war he served with an Illinois infantry regiment. He was a member of the Methodist church and of Dunham post, No. 141, G.A.R. He and Miss Sarah M. Basin were married fifty-four years ago. Three of their six children have died. He is survived by his wife and three children – Mrs. L.E. Crapp and Lee Munson of Decatur and Mrs. M.G. Consiant of Illiopolis. There are four grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

The body was removed to the L.A. Monson undertaking establishment and prepared for burial.

The Decatur Daily Review, Decatur IL, 10 Apr 1925, pg. 12





  MURREY, William Sr.

William Murray, Sr. - died Saturday morning at 6 o'clock in St. Anthony's hospital, Effingham, Illinois from kidney trouble, aged 83 years. He was born in the County of Kildare, Ireland, August 20, 1821 and came to America in 1848. Shortly afterwards going to Little Rock, Ark. where he engaged in the painting business. During the civil war he conducted a bakery furnishing bread to the union forces which were quartered there.

After the war he decided to come north and purchase farm land, buying 400 acres near Casner, Illinois on which he made extensive improvements among them being one of the finest brick farm houses in Macon county. He continued as farmer and stock buyer until 1889 when he retired and came to Decatur to live, going to Effingham, Illinois four years ago where he remained until his death. He was a great admirer of Daniel O'Connell, the great Irish statesman, having often heard him speak on the wrongs of Ireland. He was educated in the college of St. Omer and Donal, where O'Connell received his education. He is survived by his widow and four sons and one daughter: W.C. Murray of Casner, J.J. Murray of Spokane, Wash., H.T. Murray of Pullman, Wash., C.E. Murray who is in Alaska and Mrs. Will Donovan of this city. The body will remain in Effingham until the arrival of his two sons from Washington and will then be brought to this city and buried in Calvary cemetery.

Decatur Herald, 24 May 1904

Click here for probate information.





  MUSGRAVE, Hezekiah

The remains of Hezekiah Musgrave arrived here yesterday morning from Colorado. The deceased was the oldest brother of the late Mrs. T.T. Roberts and met a tragic death at Lico, Colorado, about forty miles from Durango. On the 18th of last February he was caught in an immense snow slide and his body buried beneath forty feet of frozen snow and ice. All efforts to recover the remains at that time were unavailing, and it was not until the 18th of the present month that his friends succeeded in getting the body, which was then forwarded to Decatur. Funeral services were held at Greenwood cemetery yesterday afternoon, and were attended by the relatives of the unfortunate man. The services were conducted by Rev. W.H. Prestley, of the Presbyterian church, and the body was interred in a grave alongside of the lamented Mrs. Roberts. The deceased was thirty-four years old, and his tragic death is mourned by all who knew him.

Daily Review, Decatur, IL, 29 May 1886





  MUSSELMAN, Mrs. Elizabeth

Mrs. Elizabeth Musselman died at 8:50 a.m. Friday, December 13 at her home, 546 South Jackson street, aged 42 years. She leaves 6 children, Mrs. C. Moore, Mrs. L.Eley, Miss Ella Musselman and William, Fred and Edward Musselman.

Bulletin Sentinal, 21 December 1895





  MUSSELMAN, Jacob

Jacob Musselman was born Lancaster Co Pa. Nov. 25 1833 and died at his home in Linden IA. June 24 1913 age 80 years 6 months and 29 days.

He was married in 1855 and to this union four children were born two of whom are now living. A son and daughter; W.M Musselman of Argenta IL. and Mrs Anna Ward of Pennsylvania. In 1867 he was again married to Ann Cooper in Macon Co IL. To this union 9 children were born 8 of whom are living, one a son James died when but one year old. The children are Mrs. Mary Nichols of Emmetsburg. Mrs Dora Tate of Linden IA. Jacob of Clarinda. Mrs Ida Nichols of Stuart. Mrs Francis Linn of Washington. Charles of Earlham, and Zenith and Mahala who are at home. Deceased enrolled in the service of his country Jan. 25th 1864 in Company A 2nd Regiment of IL cavalry volunteers and was discharged Nov 22 1865 at San Antonio Texas. He moved from IL to Guthrie County IA in 1892 and moved again about 8 years ago to his home at out one mile south west of Linden.

He was a man who had been sorely afflicted and had passed through many a hard struggle. He was a good husband, a kind father, and an accommodating neighour. He professed his faith in the Lord Jusus Christ a number of years ago, uniting with the Church of God. He has been ailing for something like four years, during this time has been very feeble, but his last recent sickness occurred some four or five weeks ago when he was taken very ill, but he rallied from this and was able to be out and around.

Members of the family thought him very much improved until Wednesday morning he wanted to go into the garden and slipping away from the rest of the family went out into the potato patch. As soon as he was missed a search was instituted and he was found by his youngest son Zenith in the garden dead. He had possibly been dead an hour. There was no evidence of any kind of struggle. He had apparently passed peacefully away. Funeral services were held in Morrisburg church conducted by Rev. Ida Menagh of Linden. Remains were laid to rest in Morrisburg cemetery.

CARD OF THANKS

We wish to thank our friends and neighbors for the many acts of kindness and assistance to us at the time of the death and burial or our husband and father May heavens choicest blessings rest on each one.

Mrs Anna Musselman and family





  MUSSER, Adam   

Adam Musser died at 11 a.m. Friday, Dec 6, at the home of his son, Bert Musser, six miles northwest of the city, aged ?8 years. Mr. Musser was an old settler and was a veteran of the Civil War. He is survived by a wife, five daughters and two sons. The funeral will be held at 11 a.m. Sunday from the Harristown church.

The Daily Review, Decatur IL, 6 Dec 1901, pg. 7





  MYER, Ella

Mrs. Frank Myer, wife of the bartender at Steinbach & Deichoff's, died yesterday noon of puerperal fever, after a brief illness. The deceased was well known and her death will be deeply regretted by a large circle of friends. The funeral will take place on Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock from the German Lutheran church.

The Daily Review, Decatur, IL, 23 Feb 1886





  MYERS, Alice

The funeral of Mrs. Alice Myers will be held at 1 o'clock this afternoon at the family residence in Long Creek township. The body will be placed in the mausoleum in Greenwood.

Decatur Review, 26 Oct 1913





  MYERS, Annabell (Wallace)
    Born:
    Died: 30 Jul 1933 in Mt. Zion, Macon Co, IL
    Buried: Fairlawn Mausoleum
    Parents:
    Married:
    Children:




  MYERS, Charles L.
    Born:
    Died: 25 Mar 1947 in Decatur, Macon Co, IL
    Buried:
    Parents:
    Married:
    Children:




  MYERS, Frank

Frank, the four year old son of Mr. and Mrs. James Myers, of Long Creek, died on Monday evening at eight o’clock of membraneous croup. The funeral will take place to-day at two o’clock, and the remains will be buried at the North Fork cemetery.

The Daily Review, 3 Mar 1886





  MYERS, Gertrude A. (Hott)
    Born:
    Died: 13 Apr 1966 in Decatur, Macon Co, IL
    Buried:
    Parents:
    Married:
    Children:




  MYERS, Hannah

The funeral of the late Mrs. Hannah Myers will be held Wednesday forenoon at Warrensburg. The interment will be at the Spangler cemetery east of Decatur.

Decatur Daily Republican, Decatur, IL, 16 Jan 1894





  MYERS, Harriet M. (Nicholson)
    Born: 13 Sep 1863 in Long Creek Twp, Macon Co, IL
    Died: 20 Jun 1940 in Decatur, Macon Co, IL
    Buried: North Fork Cem, Macon Co, IL
    Parents: James P. & Elizabeth (Hawks) Nicholson
    Married: 30 Aug 1885 in Macon Co, IL to Joseph C. Myers
    Children: Edith, Bessie, Lawrence, Martin, Marie, Harold, Mildred & Ruth




  MYERS, John O.

JOHN O.MYERS, 77, NEAR DECATUR, DIES

Farmer Southeast of Town Passes Away Tuesday

John O. Myers, farmer, four miles southeast of Decatur died at his home at 9 o'clock Tuesday morning. He had been in fail(ing?) health for two years but had been bedfast only since Sunday. He was born in Ross county, Ohio, Nov. 15, 1849, and came with his parents to Macon county when three years of age. He had lived in Mt. Zion and Long Creek counties all his life. He leaves his wife, three daughters, Mrs. Sadie McCane of Long Creek; Mrs. Henry Hart of Decatur; Mrs. James Pemble of Decatur; one son. Harry Myers of Springfield and one sister, Mrs. Melissa Nitsche of Decatur. He was a member of Mt. Zion Presbyterian church and Mt. Zion lodge I. O. O. F The funeral will be held at 2:30 Thursday afternoon at the Mt. Zion Presbyterian church, and interment will be in Mt. Zion cemetery.

Decatur Review (Decatur, Illinois), 10 August 1926

Submitted by Merry Keith.





  MYERS, Joseph C.
    Born: Dec 1858 in OH
    Died: 22 Nov 1928 in Macon Co, IL
    Buried: North Fork Cem, Macon Co, IL
    Parents:
    Married: 30 Aug 1885 in Macon Co, IL to Harriet Nicholson
    Children: Edith, Bessie, Lawrence, Martin, Marie, Harold, Mildred & Ruth
AGED RESIDENT OF LONG CREEK DIES

Joseph C. Myers Wouls Have Been 70 in December

Joseph C. Myers of route 8 near North Fork, died at 5:10 o'clock Thursday morning St. Mary's hospital. He would have been seventy years old in December. His death was caused by lobar pneumonia.

Mr. Myers was born in Chillicothe, O., Dec. 20, 1858, but had lived in the vicinity of Long Creek ever since he was a boy. He and Miss Hattie M. Nicholson of Long Creek township were married in 1885. He was widely known in the community and had many friends. He was a member of the North Fork Presbyterian church and the Mt. Zion Odd Fellows lodge. He is survived by his wife and the following children; Lawrence N. Myers, of Decatur, Martin J. Myers, of Mt. Zion; Harold D. Myers of Buenos Ayres, Argentina, and Mrs. Zoe Marie Holcomb of Oakley; Mrs. Mildred F. Hinds and Miss Ruth V. Myers of Decatur. There are eleven grand-children. He also leaves two brothers and two sisters, William Myers of Bloomington, Samuel Myers of Marion, O., Mrs. Margaret Goss of Rochester, Ind., and Mrs. Jennie Stimmel of Decatur. The body was taken to Dawson & Wikoff funeral directors, and prepared for burial.

Decatur Review, Decatur, IL, 22 Nov 1928





  MYERS, Lawrence
    Born: Jan 1889 in IL
    Died: 2 Oct 1937 in Decatur, Macon Co, IL
    Buried: North Fork Cem, Macon Co, IL
    Parents: Joseph C. & Harriet M. (Nicholson) Myers
    Married:
    Children:




  MYERS, Lewis W.
    Born:
    Died: 31 Mar 1915 in Mt. Zion, Macon Co, IL
    Buried:
    Parents:
    Married:
    Children:




  MYERS, Martin Joseph
    Born:
    Died: Sep 1973 in Decatur, Macon Co, IL
    Buried: Mt. Zion Cem, Macon Co, IL
    Parents:
    Married:
    Children:




  MYERS, Myrtis (Gunter)
    Born: in McLeansboro, IL
    Died: 17 Aug 1944
    Buried:
    Parents:
    Married:
    Children:




  MYERS, Robert P.I.

Funeral services for Robert P.I. Myers were conducted at 3 o'clock Monday afternoon in the Long Creek Methodist church by Rev. C.L. Bell and were attended by a large number of friends. A male quartet, consisting of Charles Davis, Edwin Davis, Roscoe Davis and Joseph Myer sang three hymns. Miss Helen Ritter furnished the instrumental music for the service.

Flowers were in charge of Mrs. Mayme McBride, Mrs. Grace Brook, Mrs. Dora Fulton, Miss Alice Myers, Mrs. Isabella Davis and Mrs. Lucy Davis. Active pall-bearers were E.B. Chapman, A.B. Chapman, N.A. Myers, Archer T. Davis, W.P. Camp and E.D. Camp. Honorary pallbearers were Charles N. Reynolds, W.T. Hunt, M.C. Greenfield, C.E. Jones, J.L. Albert and O.W. Albert. The burial was in the family plot in the Florey cemetery.





  MYERS, Samuel

Death Of Samuel Myers

Samuel Myers, one of the prominent famers in Long Creek township, and one of the old settlers of the county, died at his late home near North Fork C.P. church in Long Creek township at 10 o'clock Saturday morning. The demise of Mr. Myers was quite sudden and was a great shock to his neighbors and the members of his family. In the early part of the day he began working in the garden and shortly before the time of his death went into the house to get a drink. While in the house he was seized with a violent pain in the heart and his death resulted a few moments later. Deceased was 77 years of age. A few weeks ago he suffered greatly the infirmities of old age and from the heart affection, but sought medical aid and in time was able to perform the light work about the premises. Mr. Myers is survived by four sons and one daughter. The sons are James, Lewis, Frank and John W. Myers, all of Long Creek township. The daughter lives in one of the western states and was informed by telegraph of the death of her father.

Herald Despatch (Decatur), 13 April 1898

Samuel Myers, a resident of Macon county since 1850 died suddenly of valvular heart trouble about noon Saturday April 9, at the family home, near North Fork. He was the father of E.C. Myers of Warrensburg, John W. Myers of Decatur, Louis, James and Frank Myers, who are residents of Macon county and live near the homeplace. Nellie, the daughter, is married and lives in Kansas.

Mr. Myers was born in Ohio in 1848. He came to Macon county in 1850 has resided here ever since. He was held in high esteem by all who knew him, and his acquaintances was very large. He was a remarkably well preserved man and retained his health and strength till a little over a year ago. Up to two years ago he worked in the field and did the regular farm work, apparently with as little effort as in his younger days. He had been failing for about a year, but lately had appeared to improve.

Mrs. Myers is confined to her bed with a broken hip, having fallen on the ice during the winter.

The funeral of the late Samuel Myers was held this forenoon at 10:30 o'clock from the residence in Long Creek township. There was a large attendance and the burial took place at the North Fork cemetery.

Decatur Weekly Republican, 4 April 1889





  MYERS, Samuel Tyler
    Born: 10 Aug 1859 in Miamisburgh, OH
    Died: Feb 1944
    Buried:
    Parents:
    Married:
    Children:




  MYERS, William J.   

William J. Myers died at 8 o’clock Wednesday night at his farm home four miles northeast of Argenta. He would have been seventy-six years old in June. He had been in failing health for a long time, but had been confined to his bed only four days.

Mr. Myers was a veteran of the Civil war. He enlisted at the outbreak of the war and served three years in the Second Illinois Cavalry. At the close of that enlistment he reentered the service and remained till the close of the war, being mustered out in Aug., 1865.

Mr. Myers was born in Macon county June 21, 1843. With his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Emanuel Myers, he moved to DeWitt county in 1851. After the war he returned to DeWitt county and remained there until 1874. He then moved to the farm near Argenta and remained there until his death, forty-five years. He served the township as justice of the peace for many years and was widely known, and held in high regard by all. He is survived by four daughters, Mrs. Ollie Day of Maroa, Mrs. John Brakett of Cisco, Miss Flora Myers and Miss Viola Myers, and one son, James Myers, all residing on the home farm. He also leaves a brother Washington Myers and a sister Mrs. Dellers, both of Argenta.

Decatur Review, Decatur IL, 27 Mar 1919, pg. 9




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